Women in Research:
Breaking the glass ceiling

Catalina Vladut is a young Gastroenterology specialist affiliated to the Clinical Emergency Hospital ‘Agrippa Ionescu’, Bucharest, Romania. Her interest in research led her to enroll in her PhD in pancreatology. She is member of UEG’s Young Talent Group and their cross-representative on UEG’s Equality & Diversity Task Force. This is her unique perspective on the session ‘Career Chat: Women in Research’ at UEG Week 2019.

Watch the Facebook live video of the Career Chat session.
The ‘glass ceiling’ is used as a metaphor to describe the frequent and undefined barriers in the workplace that exist for women, but also (other) minorities such as ethnicity, age, or social status. Introduced in 1839 by French feminist and author George Sand, the metaphor was first used in 1978 in a speech by Marianne Schriber and Katherine Lawrence [1,2]. In 2018, an article in the Economist reported on a gender pay gap of 14% (in decline), with a higher equality rate in Northern Europe, whilst Japan, South Korea and Turkey remain at the bottom of the list [3].
Although we see an overall increase of female researchers, a number of problems remain: women in research receive less funding, take longer to apply for leading positions, and have less representation in research institutions. In health care, diversity among providers brings solutions to patients that have specific needs. Sometimes it is easier for patients to speak to a healthcare professional of the same gender,  e.g. when being referred to colonoscopy. Diversity among staff brings new and different approaches, leading to the best possible care for all patients.
Taking advantage of UEG Week 2019, UEG’s Equality & Diversity Task Force together with Young Talent Group organized the session "Career Chat: Women in Research" to highlight the hot topic of research gender bias and encourage women to enter and advance in research careers. 
The audience and the panel were both male and female, with Dr. Luigi Ricciardiello acting as the moderator alongside Iris Dotan, Patrizia Burra, and Julia Mayerle. These three powerful female role models offered different perspectives on careers in medical research and the work-family conflict. Iris Dotan is director of the Division of Gastroenterology at the Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel. Patrizia Burra is head of the Multivisceral Transplant Unit at Padua University Hospital, Italy. Julia Mayerle is Professor of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Munich University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Germany. Currently, Julia is member of UEG’s Research Committee. Luigi Ricciardello is Associate Professor in the Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Gastroenterology Unit of the University of Bologna, and chair of UEG’s Research Committee. All speakers agreed that while the interest in research required a lot of time and effort, the output was extraordinary; and although the work-family conflict occurs early in a woman’s GI career, it is not absent in the male GI career either and should therefore not be disregarded. Moreover, the panel agreed that diversity in a department offers different solutions for developing unique areas. 
The lounge setting allowed for free discussions between senior and young GI’s and an open dialogue with somewhat difficult questions to be asked out loud. However, the feedback from the panel was positive and provided essential take-home messages.
Read Catalina’s ten ideas to get your research career on track. 
References:
  1. Federal Glass Ceiling Commission. Good for Business: Making Full Use of the Nation's Human Capital. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Labor, March 1995.
  2. Harlan, Elizabeth (2008). George Sand. Yale University Press. p. 256. ISBN 978-0-300-13056-0.
  3. The glass-ceiling index, The Economist

Women in Research:
Ten ideas to get your research career on track

Catalina Vladut is a young Gastroenterology specialist affiliated to the Clinical Emergency Hospital ‘Agrippa Ionescu’, Bucharest, Romania. Her interest in research led her to enroll in her PhD in Pancreatology. She is member of UEG’s Young Talent Group and their cross-representative on UEG’s Equality & Diversity Task Force. Here are her tips for your research career, based on the session ‘Career Chat: Women in Research’ at UEG Week 2019.

Read also Catalinas’ perspective on the Career Chat session. 
  1. Fellowships are an essential part of one’s medical education, especially when it comes to research. Even if some centers provide less clinical practice, if these are centers of excellence in research, the experience will boost your knowledge. This means making a big change in your life, but the benefit will be remarkable regardless how long you stay there. UEG helps young investigators with a Visiting Fellowship or a Research Fellowship.

  2. ‘Most of us spend too much time on what is urgent and not enough on what is important’ (Stephen Covey). Time management is essential when it comes to effectiveness, efficiency, and productivity. Set priorities and identify tasks that need immediate attention (urgent vs. important). Be flexible as there can be changes along the way.

  3. Identify and hold-on to your passion: basic or translational science, clinical practice, management, different topics in GI, etc. Try to make all these experiences so that in the end you know what your field of interest is.

  4. Choose a great mentor in an excellence center, according to your field of interest, but never forget that it is a two-way street. Therefore, you should become a good mentee and be willing to develop yourself.

  5. Emotional and practical support at home is essential. The partner is the key ingredient to a happy life, being able to share the burden and take on some tasks. Never forget the family support, especially grandparents who can be a great solution. However, family and work remain two separate entities in your life. Try not to intertwine them, yet do not neglect one of the two. Studies show that maintaining a good work-life balance increases productivity.

  6. Networking helps you expand your horizon and improve your medical knowledge. Participating in scientific meetings, workshops, or courses and interacting with worldwide experts can bring new perspectives and offer you the tools necessary to develop yourself and your home hospital.

  7. Healthy mind, healthy body. Be careful about burn-out: studies have shown that burn-out occurs 1.6 times more often in female physicians. Do not overwork yourself and try to find the time to relax. Find a passion or hobby and give it the amount of time it deserves.
  8. Self-confidence: be aware of your strength and do not underestimate your assets. Go forward to apply for grants and other opportunities.

  9. Face the ‘mommy gap bias’, meaning the challenge of reentering your medical career after staying at home with your children. Many medical programs were implemented to facilitate the career reentry, yet all you need is dedication and willpower. Moreover, studies show that while paternity leave is overlooked, it can have a great positive impact on the mothers’ health [1].

  10. Be aware of the sacrifice! The keyword was ‘sacrifice’ since both senior male and female GI’s that attended the Career Chat were able to admit that every choice has an impact on the personal or professional life. However, all these choices define us for who we become in time.
References:
  1. Burtle A, Bezruchka. “Population Health and Paid Parental Leave: What the United States Can Learn from Two Decades of Research”. Healthcare (Basel). 2016 Jun; 4(2): 30. doi: 10.3390/healthcare4020030

UEG Education: learn, advance, excel

Exciting new UEG Education learning formats to look out for in 2020.

There are many different ways to learn, both in the classroom and online. Here, Natalie Wood, Lead Editor of UEG E-learning, introduces some exciting new UEG Education learning formats to look out for in the coming months and provides a rundown of what’s already on offer. A reminder of how UEG Education hopes to cater for all!

Hopefully, the fact that you're reading this GI Hive blog means you’re already aware of what UEG Education has to offer. But do you know about the exciting new learning opportunities coming your way? All are designed to complement the different learning formats already available to benefit your learning. 

UEG Masterclass

One of our exciting new projects is the "UEG Masterclass”. This format offers the best of both worlds — a blended learning experience that connects online and classroom elements. Learners will undertake a short, tailored programme of online learning before spending 2 days with expert faculty and fellow participants for case-based learning in small groups. The classroom element will reinforce and build on the online learning. Indeed, a UEG Masterclass will not only provide participants with an excellent knowledge base but the confidence to apply what they have learnt. 
For those of you with an interest in pancreatic disease, the very first multidisciplinary UEG Masterclass will be on chronic pancreatitis. Thanks to the hard work of the Masterclass taskforce, led by Programme Director and Education Committee member Djuna Cahen, our expert faculty is in place and the programme is agreed, with the classroom element taking place at the House of European Gastroenterology in Vienna on January 21–22, 2021. Spaces are limited, so make sure you don't miss the opportunity to take part — registration will soon be open!

UEG Webinars

Another new learning format we’re introducing is “UEG Webinars”. We’ll be inviting experts to cover new, hot or controversial topics, topics that are becoming better understood, and to perhaps offer differing or new perspectives. The webinars may take the form of a debate or a case presentation, for example, but you will always have the opportunity to interact with the experts and to ask questions, all from the comfort of your own chosen location! UEG Webinars will be scheduled for the evening and last ~30 minutes (depending on the level of interactivity). Registration is completely free, but spaces will be limited, so don’t forget to sign up if you're interested.
The eagle-eyed amongst you may have already seen the announcement for the inaugural UEG Webinar “What's new in FMT?”, which will take place on March 3, 2020, at 19:00 (GMT)/20:00 (CE). We’re very lucky to have lined up experts Georgina Hold and Josbert Keller for the webinar and Imran Aslam from the UEG Education Committee as moderator. Registration is now open, so sign up for free if you want to learn who faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is for, how it's performed and whether or not it's safe!

UEG Learning bytes

The final new activity we’re bringing your way in the coming months is “UEG Learning bytes”. Each one will cover a single specific topic in the field and meet a single learning objective. Taking just a few minutes to watch, these online videos will provide a condensed and quick way to enhance your knowledge. The UEG Learning bytes will be freely available to those with a myUEG account via ueg.eu/education. 
So far, the topics that we plan to cover as Learning bytes include variceal banding, HRM tracing, PEG placement and foreign bodies, with many more ideas in the pipeline. Look out for the UEG Learning bytes, starting in Q2 2020.

Current offerings

For those of you who can't wait for the new activities to launch, why not remind yourself of the UEG Education offerings you can already access? There are many well-established activities that are designed to complement each other and offer different ways of learning, according to your preferences — many also have the benefit of being CME accredited!
Our classroom courses offer intense face-to-face learning experiences and all provide the perfect opportunity to network with peers and experts. Unlike previous years, you can now choose to attend one of three Basic Science Courses – with groups sizes capped at 15 there is increased emphasis on hands-on training and interaction with tutors and faculty. The Basic Science Courses on offer in 2020 are “Gut microbiota: relevance, analysis, modulation”, “Basic & translational research in motility & neurogastroenterology” and “Hot topics in experimental GI cancer”. Or you could apply for our ever-popular clinically oriented Summer School, which combines practical skills training with state-of-the-art lectures and case presentations. Alternatively, you could choose the Young Investigators Meeting, which specialises in research, statistics and writing papers, or the Evidence-Based Medicine Course, which takes place during UEG Week and uses clinical cases to explore how best to tackle the search for evidence on which clinical practice can be based.
If online learning works for you then there are 20 UEG online courses to choose from, plus several others from member societies. Most of the courses last no longer than an hour and all are split into sections that you can dip in and out of when you have time. The courses are generally made up of comprehensive PPT slides, bespoke presentations and video footage, and there is an opportunity to test your pre- and post-course knowledge. High-quality infographic course overviews are also available for our most recent online courses. Topics covered so far include ERCP, gastrointestinal NETs, GORD (both diagnosis and pathophysiology), chronic and autoimmune pancreatitis, constipation, colorectal polyps and polypectomy. More online courses will be made available in 2020, starting with the epidemiology and aetiology of IBD and acute pancreatitis — both coming soon!
The “Mistakes in…” series offers another chance to learn from the experts, this time in a written format. The beauty of these concise articles is that they go beyond what can be found in textbooks and equip learners with the tips and insight needed to avoid making the mistakes that are obvious to those with experience. Each article discusses up to 10 mistakes, which may be common or infrequent but with a high clinical impact. More than 40 articles have been published so far and new articles are added on an ongoing basis — all are available for free to myUEG users! And for those of you who like watching presentations, we were asked to put together a “Mistakes in…” session for both UEG Week 2018 and UEG Week 2019, with more sessions to come in 2020!
For case-based online learning, our ‘Decide on the Spot’ articles present a brief scenario and then pose one or more questions for you to answer, with the correct answer and discussion posted online shortly after. The cases are generally clinical, but relevant basic science scenarios are available too. Details of the DOTs articles are posted on various social media channels with interactive polling available.
For those who like controversy or debate, our "Head-to-Head" blogs are very short opinion-based articles that promote opposing viewpoints on a whole range of topics. Discussion of topics is actively encouraged via Social Media polls, so be sure to have your say! The Head-to-Head blogs can be found alongside the GI Hive blogs, which provide young European gastroenterologists with up-to-date information on life, career development and education.

UEG Education roadmap 2020 and strategy

Finally, if you would like to hear more about the UEG Education roadmap for 2020 and the strategy for the years ahead, please take a look at the article from UEG Education Chair, Charles Murray, which he recently wrote for the UEG Journal. In addition to all the projects mentioned above, Charlie outlines how, in collaboration with the EBGH, we are mapping UEG Education content to the Blue Book, making UEG the go-to resource for anyone undertaking the European Specialty Examination in Gastroenterology and Hepatology [ESEGH].
All in all, regardless of how you like to learn, we hope that UEG Education provides you with all the resources you need to learn, advance and excel!

How to identify possible scientific partners

Follow these tips on how to find potential research collaborators. 

Finding new potential collaborators and the exchange with colleagues to promote your research is crucial for GI specialists.

Pedro Rodrigues, a new member of the Young Talent Group in 2020, shares the most useful tips on how to identify a possible scientific partner.

Tip 1: Do attend the most important meetings in your field of expertise.

It is essential to attend the most relevant congresses in order to maximize the opportunity to meet new potential collaborators and to promote your own work. In this regard, attending UEG Week on a yearly basis and being actively involved in the several activities that are organized by UEG (Summer School, Basic Science Courses, Young Investigators Meeting, etc.) constitutes the perfect platform to meet new people and establish good partnerships.  

Tip 2: Try to synergize with good people. 

Don’t go only for the best, but for the friendly ones. It is important to be surrounded by good friends. Therefore, identify good collaborators not only by their area of expertise but also try to connect with easy-going and friendly people that will make your scientific life stronger, easier and straightforward. 

Tip 3: Identify partners that complement your research and interests.  

Selecting collaborators that are able to complement your research is key. Joint efforts between people with different perspectives helps us with overcoming our flaws and weaknesses and  will greatly increase our success.  

Tip 4: Engage researchers from different areas in order to create your own multidisciplinary network. 

Collaborate with partners from different fields and topics, which may generate innovative and different ideas, and will allow you to develop richer and more complete projects . Diversity is the key to greater achievements. To help you get in touch with other researchers, UEG is establishing a dedicated platform, the UEG Researchers Network. You can already register to receive the latest information on EU funding calls and other opportunities 

Tip 5: Collaborate with researchers that do not come with problems, but with solutions. 

Your collaborators should add significant value to your research, instead of fomenting fights. Each one of your partners should be able to contribute with valuable ideas and projects. 

Tip 6: Select partners from all over the world.

Including worldwide investigators in your network is key in order to increase the probability of identifying new research calls and to apply for funding with your collaborative group.

 Tip 7: Don’t forget to move!!!

Mobility is one of the most important factors when you are considering the creation of your collaborative networks. Meeting people from other institutions and connect with other types of work will greatly enrich your CV and will allow you to select important partners to be included in your daily life. In this regard, the UEG Research Fellowship constitutes an excellent opportunity to visit a new research institution, to learn new techniques, to develop new projects and ideas and finally to effectively connect with new scientific partners. 

Tip 8: Be involved in relevant associations and groups, and ask for help whenever necessary.

Contact and be actively involved in national and international gastroenterology associations, including UEG. By doing so, you will be able to meet people that might help you in your quest. Do not hesitate to contact them when you need help in finding new scientific partners. Thus, becoming part of UEG and diving into the UEG Talent Pool is key in getting to know new people and to interact with key potential collaborators.  

Tip 9: Don´t be shy! Just do it.

If you are interested in establishing a new collaboration please make the first move! Approach people and make the first contact. Do not hesitate to introduce yourself and to try to establish a potential collaboration.

Liver biopsy for evaluation of fibrosis in chronic liver disease: Yes or no?

Two experts present their viewpoints 

Chronic liver disease affects many millions of people worldwide and is a major cause of premature death. Assessing liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease can determine disease stage and progression, and also response to therapy, but whether this is best performed via a liver biopsy or noninvasive methods is a matter for debate.

Here, two European experts present their opposing viewpoints on how to assess fibrosis in the setting of chronic liver disease.

Yes—Dina Tiniakos

Biopsy is the reference method for evaluating liver fibrosis and the ‘gold standard’ against which noninvasive methods are compared. The histological stage of fibrosis is one of the most important prognostic factors in patients with chronic liver disease, independent of aetiology. Advanced fibrosis is a strong prognostic factor in alcohol-related liver disease and the most important prognostic indicator in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), where individual histological fibrosis stages are associated with distinct patient outcomes. 
Liver biopsy is the only way to diagnose nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and, generally, offers the added value of assessing disease severity, highlighting possible concurrent disease and evaluating fibrosis progression or regression in paired biopsy samples. The known limitations of sampling and interobserver variability are minimized by high-quality biopsy techniques (using ≤16-gauge needles, core length >15 mm) and evaluation by expert hepatopathologists. Recently, digital image analysis and second harmonic generation technology have enabled objective quantitative and qualitative assessment of liver tissue collagen and can highlight subtle differences in fibrosis between biopsy samples. 
Noninvasive methods of assessing liver fibrosis are widely used with increasing accuracy for diagnosing the absence of fibrosis or presence of severe fibrosis/cirrhosis and, therefore, are helpful to select patients for liver biopsy. However, noninvasive methods cannot distinguish intermediate stages of fibrosis and some serum marker measurements may reflect fibrotic processes in other organs. Failure of application (2–5%), unreliable results (11–15%) and false-positive results in acute inflammation, cholestasis or liver congestion are known limitations of transient elastography, while the patented serum markers have limited availability. While noninvasive tests reduce the need for liver biopsy for fibrosis evaluation they cannot replace it. 
References
  • Almpanis Z, Demonakou M and Tiniakos D. Evaluation of liver fibrosis: "Something old, something new…". Ann Gastroenterol 2016; 29: 445–453.
  • Lackner C and Tiniakos D. Fibrosis and alcohol-related liver disease. J Hepatol 2019; 70:294–304.

No–Laurent Castera

Over the past decade, there has been growing interest in novel noninvasive strategies for the evaluation of fibrosis, given the well-known limitations of taking liver biopsy samples — invasiveness, limited patient acceptance, rare but potentially life threatening complications, sampling variability, pathologist experience, and cost. Taking liver biopsy samples also appears unrealistic considering the magnitude of the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) epidemic, with around 25% of the general population affected in Western countries. 
Noninvasive testing currently relies on two different but complementary approaches: measuring the levels of serum biomarkers and estimating liver stiffness using ultrasound-based elastography techniques, with transient elastography (FibroScanTM) being the pioneer. Although these two approaches are complementary, they are based on different rationales and concepts. Transient elastography measures liver stiffness related to elasticity, which corresponds to a genuine and intrinsic physical property of the liver parenchyma. By contrast, serum biomarkers are combinations of several, not strictly liver-specific, blood parameters that are optimized to predict the stages of fibrosis as assessed by liver biopsy. 
The most validated noninvasive biomarker tests are FIB-4, AST to platelet ratio index (APRI), NAFLD fibrosis score (nonproprietary formula) and FibroTestTM (proprietary), while FibroScanTM is the most validated elastography technique. All these tests are better at ruling severe fibrosis-cirrhosis out than ruling it in. They also have prognostic value in the context of cirrhosis. For instance, they are able to identify the subgroup of NAFLD patients at high risk of developing liver-related complications and death. As a result, noninvasive tests are now widely used in routine clinical practice and included in national and international guidelines. 
References
  • European Association for the Study of the Liver and Asociacion Latinoamericana para el Estudio del Higado. EASL-ALEH Clinical Practice Guidelines: Non-invasive tests for evaluation of liver disease severity and prognosis. J Hepatol 2015; 63: 237–264.
  • Castera L, Friedrich-Rust M and Loomba R. Noninvasive assessment of liver disease in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Gastroenterology 2019; 156: 1264–281.

What not to do at UEG Week

Most common things you should avoid when attending UEG Week, to help you get the most out of your congress participation.

Attending international conferences is important to stay up to date in the world of digestive health. For junior specialists, a big congress like UEG Week can be overwhelming. Henriette Heinrich is Gastroenterology Consultant in the Stadtspital Triemli, Zuerich, Switzerland, and incoming chair of the Young Talent Group. She has summarised the most common things you should avoid when attending UEG Week, to help you get the most out of your congress participation.

1. Not attending!

The biggest mistake you could make, of course, is not attending UEG Week at all. But fear not, if wild animals, bosses or other commitments keep you from attending, there is still the opportunity to access all the important talks from this year’s UEG Week and all previous UEG Weeks. Watch the content you missed any time, any place, anywhere via UEG Week 24/7. But still... you should really attend UEG Week. 

2. Not planning ahead @UEG Week 

This is probably one of the major pitfalls! First of all, try to make sure you benefit from early bird registration and if you are an undergraduate student, trainee or PhD student from reduced fees for registration.
For first-time visitors and the curious serial attendee, watch out for this year’s scavenger hunt at the Young GI Lounge to help you find your way around! Be prepared to be overwhelmed by the sheer magnitude of what the UEG Week programme has to offer, no matter how many times you’ve attended. It’s like a GI candy store — and you have an unlimited budget. 
If you do not plan ahead, you will be torn between all the exciting, cutting-edge, hot-off-the press scientific presentations, the networking and the educational events like the Postgraduate Teaching (PGT) Programme. You will be an overexcited, highly disoriented, happily zooming-around butterfly, but completely exhausted and queuing for a taxi at the end of the day to go back to your hotel and sleep (missing out on various networking social events that we’ll cover later).  
But fear not, we can fix you up.
Use the UEG Week Mobile App to structure your day and the UEG Week Pathways to help tailor your perfect programme. If you are absolutely torn between two parallel sessions, stay calm and watch the session you missed online later. Because your registration for UEG Week conveniently gives you free access to the UEG Library, which features UEG Week 24/7! 
And if you really are not a person to use a smart phone or computer, there is always the programme wall on-site in Hall 8.0 where pathways are signposted day by day to help you find your way. Furthermore, it is a great meeting spot.  

3. Not paying a visit to the Young GI Lounge (Hall 8.0) 

If you are young or already a seasoned clinician and scientist in the GI field, a visit to the Young GI Lounge to recharge and connect is highly recommended (and actually mandatory!). Not only are coffee, tea, cookies and other snacks on offer, you can also charge your phone or computer, meet interesting people and most of all attend cutting-edge events tailored to the needs of young GIs.
From checking your CV, to tips for getting your article published in UEG Journal and getting on-the-spot mentoring from experts in the field, the Young GI Lounge is the place to be.

4. Not jumping into the UEG Talent Pool 

Kickstart or refresh your career by jumping into the (heated) UEG Talent Pool, which is not only open during UEG Week, but all year round! Maybe next year you’ll be faculty? So, don’t forget your swimming gear and goggles…

5. Not attending the Young GI Network event "Let’s meet!" 

One of the worst things to happen is to be left queuing in front of the venue because you haven’t got a ticket to mingle, network and party with basically anyone who matters in the GI world (see pitfall number two). You could call it the MET Gala of Gastroenterology. Be there or be square. 

6. Not checking out the Education Booth (Hall 8.0)

Well, if you don't check out the Education Booth, you will basically be missing out on all the educational resources that will get you through the year until the next UEG Week. Like the image hub, the “Mistakes in…” series, the online courses, the UEG Library and UEG Week 24/7. Or the guideline repositories. This year, there’ll also be a fun memory game showcasing some of the images from the image hub, so why not go and try your luck to see if you can get the fastest time! 

7. Staying offline

Rookie mistake. Of course, it's great to be somewhere in person, but staying offline means you’ll be missing out on things designed to enhance your enjoyment of the meeting:
  • The UEG Week Mobile App (see pitfall number two)
  • Online content to watch or rewatch (again, see pitfall number two)
  • The UEG Week live video chats, during which surgeons and gastroenterologists battle it out and we explore the compatibility of having a job and a family. YOUR ONLINE INPUT AND QUESTIONS ARE HIGHLY APPRECIATED!
  • Missing the news updates about UEG Week on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook

8. Missing out on seriously important events on research funding for scientists 

There are several events at UEG Week that focus on research funding opportunities. Not attending these events will deliver a serious blow to your research ambitions! Be there or get left behind ;-)
Events to look out for:
  • EU funded Cooperation Networks in GI: How to get involved? 
  • Fellowships and grants: How UEG can help your career 
  • EU funding opportunities and strategy in digestive health 

9. Not bringing your team 

Seriously? There is no I in team and gastroenterology is teamwork! And what could be better for team spirit than a trip to Barcelona?!
UEG is proud to offer special fees for allied healthcare professionals and nurses as well as the UEG Week programme for nurses, so the whole team really can get involved! 

Why students should attend UEG Week

3 medical students reveal how they experienced UEG Week. 

Ivelina Georgieva, Giusi Sciume and Nikolay Manov study medicine in Italy and Bulgaria and attended UEG Week for the first time in 2018. In this video, they tell Radislav Nakov and Gianluca Ianiro why attending a big international congress can be helpful for undergraduate students’ careers as well and what they liked most about UEG Week. 

Undergraduate students benefit from our special fees and can attend the whole congress (incl. Postgraduate Teaching, Hands-on Area and Young GI Network programme) for only € 60. Register for UEG Week!

What you always wanted to know from UEG Rising Stars...

Current and previous awardees answer our questions. 

The Rising Stars Award provides a durable platform for young researchers to further improve and progress in their professional career. Current and previous UEG Rising Stars told us more about their experience receiving this award and how they benefited.  

Take the next step in your research career and apply to become a Rising Star!

Watch video interviews with other UEG Rising Stars.

How did the Rising Star Award contribute to your career in the long run? 

The Rising Star Award gave me the visibility at the national stage and helped locally to propel my academic career. The award confirmed my choice to enter gastroenterology as a medical specialisation and GI research as a topic of clinical investigation. It also catapulted me into UEG as an organisation. After the award ceremony, I was asked by Reinhold Stockbrügger to sit with the "Young Investigator Meeting" and that really caught my interest in UEG. As such, being a Rising Star allowed me to compete for leadership roles within UEG that would have been difficult to do without the award. 
Joost PH Drenth, The Netherlands, Rising Star 2004


What meant winning the UEG Rising Star Award to you and how has your career developed since you received the award?

The logical answer would be “a lot”. On the other hand, I have to say “really a lot”, indeed. There are different reasons to say that. First, the competition is very tough and the selection process, too. So, winning the award means that you did a great job and it is great that a European expert community appreciated that. Second, usually you are well known in your research field and, more in general, in your country. However, winning the UEG Rising Star Award gives you the opportunity to be known by the whole European medical community, and this helps to increase your visibility and enlarging your contacts for new amazing collaborations. Third, UEG keeps very much in mind who won the UEG Rising Star Award and makes lots of efforts to involve them and to support their activities. In practice, this means a lot for your research or clinical activity. In conclusion, I have to say that the UEG Rising Star Award is a great opportunity and the decision to apply for that was one the best one I took in my life! Good luck with your application!
Edoardo Vincenzo Savarino, Italy, Rising Star 2016


What is the right moment and career stage to apply for the Rising Star Award and what will increase candidates’ chances to receive it?

I find it difficult to pinpoint the right moment or career stage to apply for UEG’s Rising Star Award. After all, there are so many different paths to a successful career! In any case, I believe a critical aspect is to show that you have a vision. You might still only have one or two key publications in your CV, but if you appropriately describe how these are having a major impact in your field, while further fueling your independence, I would say your chances of being awarded will greatly increase. On this note, getting involved with UEG activities, namely those promoted by UEG Education and the Young Talent Group, may help in both expanding and solidifying your track record and individuality. This type of undertakings shows how passionate you are about your work and career, an essential pre-requisite for thriving as a successful scientist. This will certainly transpire in your application.
Rui Castro, Portugal, Rising Star 2015


Do you have any tips for Rising Star Award applicants? What should they consider and what should they focus on? 

First of all, it is crucial to make yourself familiar with the content of the application form and the required formalities. This includes having an updated list of publications and H-index. Then, you should think carefully about how you want to present yourself and your research. This is the most important part of the application and it might be helpful to consult a mentor/senior colleague to get the broad view of your research accomplishments. Then you need to work on presenting this in a short but precise way. Again, it can be helpful to show the text to colleagues and get their feedback.
Johan Burisch, Denmark, Rising Star 2019


Do you have any tips for researchers from countries that offer fewer scientific opportunities? How can they compete in the run for the Rising Star Award?

There are two key tips that I would like to give researchers aspiring to become a Rising Star:
Firstly, choose your supervisor and mentor very wisely. Make sure that your supervisor/mentor has a track record of developing and supporting young researchers and also has time to dedicate for you.
Secondly, try to spend some time abroad, even if this is for a few months (obviously the longer the better) in a centre of excellence where you can learn a research technique and complete a research project. This is an important step in establishing a longstanding collaboration, becoming an independent researcher and increasing your research productivity. Finally, attend international congresses (such as UEG) to get inspiration and research ideas.
Emmanuel Tsochatzis, Greece, Rising Star 2014


How did you experience receiving the Rising Star Award and presenting your research on the stage?

I was leaving home after a very busy day attending my patients with pancreatitis. I closed my office’s door and checked my email on my smartphone. There it was, a message starting with the sentence: "UEG Rising Star Award 2017: Congratulations". It was absolutely awesome and I embraced a colleague who was nearby. The UEG Rising Star Award is very special to me, because it recognizes the effort of young people trying to advance in the field of research, to develop their own line of investigation, to lead projects and collaborate with other colleagues. The most important part of my talk was my last slide: I thanked my Mentor Miguel Pérez-Mateo, who died in 2008. He told me the most important tips and concepts about a research career, encouraged me to be active in education and research, and always supported me, it was the perfect moment to remember him.
Enrique de-Madaria, Spain, Rising Star 2017


Has the Rising Star Award made an impact on your career so far?

I was very honoured to receive the UEG Rising Star award in 2018 after being nominated by the European Pancreatic Club. For me the award is all about exposure and connections. It is not merely a recognition of past achievements but a real boost for my career. It gave me the opportunity to expose my research at the UEG week where I could reach out to an audience of basic scientists and clinicians working in different areas of gastroenterology. Moreover, UEG delegated me in 2019 to attend the annual meeting of the Japanese Society for Gastroenterology, a truly unique opportunity meeting new colleagues and establish new connections in a country I never had visited before. 
Ilse Rooman, Belgium, Rising Star 2018


What was your motivation to apply for the Rising Star Award and what are your expectations?

I was inspired to apply for the Rising Star Award as I am well aware of the UEG and the fantastic work they do, as well as having admiration for previous Rising Stars. As one of a pair of clinically active parents I have worked tremendously hard to establish my research programme and my independence. Following my lab’s recent successes, with the support of mentors and my national society the time was right to put myself forward for this prestigious award. By nature it is normal to question and I think often underestimate what you have achieved, but you have to be brave, back yourself and apply for awards like this. Winning this award has been a tremendous honour. It genuinely helps forge my confidence, quashing some of those inevitable doubts about what I have devoted my career towards. It is a great opportunity to share my current research and ideas with a wide audience and fantastic stepping stone for my ongoing translational research.  
Thomas Bird, UK, Rising Star 2019
Neurogastroenterology is one of most enigmatic subfields of gastroenterology. I have devoted my past 10 years to the study of innervation, neuroplasticity and neuro-inflammation in the enteric nervous system, particularly in the pancreas and large intestine.  The UEG Rising Star Award will enhance my visibility, open new possibilities for building novel research networks, and thereby increase my chances to make even greater contributions to the field in the near future. Owing to the active integration of the awareness to the organization and course of the congress, I will closely interact with promising researchers from all around the world and get inspiration from their brilliant ideas for my research. I therefore think that the biggest advantage of being a Rising Star is the unique networking opportunity behind it. 
Ihsan Ekin Demir, Germany, Rising Star 2019
Attend the “Rising Stars in gastroenterology and hepatology from Europe and Japan” session in the Young GI Lounge at UEG Week Barcelona 2019, and join the informal get-together with the presenters at the end of the session!

Women in endoscopy

Marianna Arvanitakis talks about the situation and obstacles for women in interventional endoscopy.

Marianna Arvanitakis is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Gastroenterology, Hôpital Erasme, Brussels and specialises in pancreatic disease, nutrition and endoscopy.

In this video, YTG member Ivana Mikolasevic talks to her about the situation and obstacles for women in endoscopy, in particular interventional endoscopy.

From clinical fellow to clinical lecturer – how to secure a post

Neel Sharma of the University of Birmingham shares his tips.

Post undertaking a research fellowship, the decision to remain as a clinician academic is the first one to take. If motivated and passionate enough it is a no brainer. However entering the next stage of training from fellow to lecturer is no easy feat; limited funding and posts. That in itself is a true test of your commitment.

Dr Neel Sharma, GI Registrar and Clinical Lecturer at the Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy and Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Birmingham shares his tips that may prove useful for those hoping to secure a post.
  1. Reach out to potential supervisors before submitting your application. It is advisable to show interest early on. Sending out an email and arranging an informal meeting helps to demonstrate your background thus far, your research progression during your fellowship and more importantly your understanding of the field. Supervisors are keen to know how well you recognise the current gaps in the evidence and how you may choose to solve them. Of course there is no one solution but the exchange of thinking is a fundamental element in academia. By meeting potential supervisors they can gauge how well you would fit their lab or research interests and if not which other supervisors may be better suited to you.

  2. The application form. The application process is fairly straight forward, highlighting your degrees thus far, prizes, publications and presentations. Where you will be able to set yourself apart is highlighting your long-term plan and what you can bring to the department in terms of your skillset. And here there is no right or wrong. Collaboration is key for any successful researcher. You must demonstrate an awareness of such and potential collaborations thus far is crucial. It is now overtly outdated to think that one centre can achieve academic success without reliance on other institutions. There is now no single expert. Have you taken steps to develop a network early on? Are you culturally aware? Ensuring diversity in your research network with a willingness to embrace expertise both East and West will set you apart from the rest.

  3. The interview. And last but by no means least the interview. Interviews are never plain sailing. You may have to face several. But your approach should be consistent each time. It is highly likely that you will be asked to analyse a research study. This will help to highlight to panel members your ability to condense a paper in to its main findings and of more importance its potential flaws. Gain an understanding of trial methodology and data analysis, most of which you will be familiar with post fellowship but there may be some methods or stats you may not be aware of. You will be asked about your research vision and so be concrete in your beliefs. Even if some panel members disagree stick to what you believe. And what you want to add to the field, even if widely different to the panel. Remember you are not here to solve all the research gaps but to add to the understanding of the discipline over your career. Demonstrate to the interviewers your motivation and even if criticised remember the criticisms are designed simply to ensure what you aim to contribute will be more rigorous and more translatable in the future.
Best of luck!

Achalasia: Physician versus Surgeon

Two European experts give their opposing views on the best treatment option for achalasia

Oesophageal achalasia is a rare motility disorder, in which peristalsis is impaired or absent and the lower oesophageal sphincter fails to relax. Symptoms of achalasia include dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, coughing and choking, chest pain and chest infections.

We invited two European experts to give their opposing viewpoints—physician versus surgeon—on the best treatment option for achalasia.

A Physician's Viewpoint—Paul Fockens

Although the title of this blog quickly attracted your attention, it is actually not a choice between physician and surgeon but a choice between peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) and laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). From a patient's point of view, the natural orifice approach will be preferred as it diminishes complications and reduces recovery time. But are both treatments equal in their efficacy and safety profile? There are many studies that suggest the efficacy of both POEM and LHM is excellent, but POEM has not been around very long so less evidence is available. Two large randomized controlled trials presented in abstract form and awaiting full publication both demonstrate the high efficacy of POEM, which seems equal to LHM and superior to a set of two pneumatic dilations. But how about safety? POEM is significantly less invasive, and thereby safer, than LHM; complications are very rare and usually mild. Therefore, with comparable efficacy and improved safety when compared with LHM, POEM seems to have a bright future. Is there any disadvantage to POEM? Yes, there is one issue and that is reflux. POEM can currently not be combined with an endoscopic antireflux procedure, so a significant percentage of patients will have to use proton pump inhibitors after POEM. It is up to the patient, after care has been taken to inform them about all available treatment options, to come to a shared decision with their doctor. Without a doubt in my mind, I believe POEM will frequently be the patient's favourite choice! References
  • Ponds FA, et al. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) versus pneumatic dilatation in therapy-naive patients with achalasia: results of a randomized controlled trial [abstract 637]. Gastroenterology 2017; 152 (suppl 1): S139.
  • Werner YB, et al. Endoscopic versus surgical myotomy in patients with primary idiopathic achalasia [abstract LB08]. United European Gastroenterology Journal 2018; 6: 1590.

A Surgeon's Viewpoint—Giovanni Zaninotto

Surgical treatment of oesophageal achalasia divides the muscle fibresof the distal oesophagus and cardia, leaving the underlying mucosa intact. Consequently, resistance of the lower oesophageal sphincter to the flow of the bolus is diminished. Heller myotomy, named for the German surgeon who performed it first (in 1913), has been completed laparoscopically (LHM) since 1990, with a partial wrap of the fundus added to prevent iatrogenic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). LHM has gained vast popularity because of its efficacy in reducing dysphagia (89% and 85% of patients are asymptomatic at 5 and 10 years, respectively) while maintaining a very good safety profile (mortality <0.1%, morbidity <7%). Postoperative reflux is observed in 10–20% of patients when a partial fundoplication is added to LHM. Three randomized controltrials and three meta-analyses have compared the efficacy of LHM with that of pneumatic dilation, revealing that pneumatic dilation can achieve the same efficacy as LHM only after multiple, sequential dilations. Moreover, LHM is more effective than pneumatic dilation for treatment of type III spastic achalasia. There are no randomized control trials published in full that compare LHM with POEM, though two meta-analyses show that POEM achieves slightly (but significantly) better symptomatic control than LHM, especially for type III achalasia. However, the duration of the patient follow-up was shorter for POEM, and POEM presented a higher risk of postoperative reflux (20–40%). I believe five small abdominal scars are preferable to an increased risk of GORD, and that LHM remains the 'single-shot' better option for achalasia patients. References
  • Boeckxstaens G, Zaninotto G and Richter JE. Achalasia. Lancet 2013; 383: 83–93.
  • Zaninotto G, et al. The 2018 ISDE achalasia guidelines. Dis Esoph 2018; 9: 1–31.

Dealing with nutrition, diet, microbiota and IBS

Nutrition expert Heidi Staudacher speaks about advances in IBS research.

Heidi Staudacher is a research dietician at the University of Queensland in Australia.

With Rune Stensvold from the UEG E-learning Team, she speaks about advances in IBS research and how it can be used to help IBS patients.  Have also a look at Heidi Staudacher's presentation "The low FODMAP diet: Selecting the right candidate" at UEG Week Vienna 2018

UEG Image Hub

A new source of GI images online, freely available to download.

As an editor I’m clearly a big fan of words, but I’m also a big fan of images and the way they can add value and visual interest. As part of our work, the UEG E-learning Team is always thinking about how best to illustrate our content, be it on online courses (and their summary infographics), “Mistakes in…” articles or our latest news blogs. Although we necessarily do use third-party figures or photos, as often as possible we work with our art editor and authors to develop original images, such as the few shared here in this blog. 

With the number of redrawn figures steadily rising, we decided to collect them together and make them available as a new resource - the UEG Image Hub - which can be freely accessed via the UEG Library. The images themselves can also be freely downloaded and used without needing to obtain permission. Should you wish to reuse any of the images, all we ask is that you give the appropriate credit (including the artist’s name) and cite the image source - information on how to do this is provided with the image files. If you modify any of the images, we ask that you give credit, cite the image source and state clearly that the image has been modified.
To browse all images in the UEG Image Hub, simply visit the UEG Library and select “Image Hub” as the “Format” filter in the right-hand navigation bar. Further filtering of the images can be done by “Category”. 
We do hope you find this new resource to be of value and will make use of the images provided. New images will be added as they become available, so be sure to keep visiting the UEG Image Hub in the future!

Apply for a UEG Activity Grant to produce an online course

Developing an online course is not as complicated as you may think.

Ever wondered how a UEG star online course is born? Well, with the availability of a UEG Online Course Activity Grant, it could involve a rising ‘Lady Gaga’ (minus the drama) pairing with an expert ‘Bradley Cooper’ (minus the alcohol) to deliver a non-shallow, Oscar-winning performance.
I've been working with the UEG E-Learning team since early 2014 and feel tremendously proud of how much we have grown in terms of producing online courses. Basically, we just love doing them! But more importantly, the number of users enrolling in our (free!) online courses has risen immensely, and the feedback we've been getting is tremendously positive. Now, to expand the number and breadth of online courses available, UEG is offering an Activity Grant to fund the development and publication of high-quality online courses by individuals or societies. Here's why you, as a young gastroenterologist, should apply:
First, UEG's online courses are primarily taken by young GI specialists, so it makes sense that you get involved in their development. We also know that young GIs are great at coming up with the innovative, fresh and out-of-the-box ideas, which are needed to keep our online courses relevant and appealing.
Second, developing an online course is not as complicated as you may think. There are guidelines and criteria that need to be considered, but we have put a lot of effort in trying to make everything clear and simple. So, why not enjoy a 5-minute coffee break and go through the documents? You'll see that all the material is easy to follow and pretty straightforward, and that we have resources available to help you along the way (e.g. access to our art editor and recording studio). Plus, you can always contact the E-Learning team with any questions or for advice—we are here to help throughout the whole process.
So, where to start? Pick a ‘song’ that’s missing from our ‘playlist’ and find your ‘Bradley Cooper’. Indeed, I am sure a lot of you already have a specific topic in mind, something covered by the ESBGH Blue Book that is perhaps underrepresented in UEG’s Education Library, particularly in the form of an online course. Now all you have to do is think of a recognised expert on that topic with whom you would like to work, contact her or him and start the journey! I invite you to check our latest course on Autoimmune Pancreatitis to get a general idea of one possible format. We would love to hear what other ideas you have in mind! 
Please note that the Activity Grant application deadline of April 5th refers only to submission of the application form  (general concept for the course), a summary of planned costs, and CVs of the lead author and co-author(s). So, as you can see, there is really no excuse for not applying! In any case, for further information you should refer to the "Application for support of Online Courses” section on the Activity Grants page. We look forward to receiving your application!

Tough but doable

8 Tips for passing the European Specialty Examination in Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Anthea Pisani is a gastroenterology trainee in Mater Dei Hospital in Malta. She passed the European Specialty Examination in Gastroenterology and Hepatology in April 2018 and gave a talk about “Tough but doable: A personal view on the exam” in the Young GI Lounge at the subsequent UEG Week in Vienna. Her presentation was very much appreciated, so we asked Anthea to share her top tips for passing the exam in the GI Hive.


So, you have decided to sit for the European Specialty Examination in Gastroenterology and Hepatology.  Perhaps this was a voluntary decision on your behalf in order to broaden your horizons, or it may be a mandatory aspect of your training. It may be your first attempt or maybe a re-attempt and you might be at the beginning of your training or at the end of it. Either way, good luck with your preparations. Here are some points to help guide you towards becoming a European board certified Gastroenterologist. 

From bench to the UEG floor

A personal experience from an young gastroenterologist from Egypt and how UEG helped him to achieve his goals.

Mohammed Khorshid, a young gastroenterologist, tells us his personal success story of being invited to give an oral presentation at UEG Week. 

He realised that young GIs all face similar challenges, and explains how attending UEG Week every year and participating in the Young GI Network can help to overcome these. Back home, Mohammed supports his co-workers by sharing the new knowledge and serving as a role model. He encourages his colleagues from all over the world, but especially those from less prosperous countries, to submit their abstracts to UEG Week. All abstracts are peer reviewed and authors will get the chance to present their work, as well as receive abstract related awards and travel grants. 

Follow Mohammed’s example and submit your abstract to UEG Week by April 26, 2019. 
Register for UEG Week and participate in the Young GI Network activities!
Interviewer: Radislav Nakov

UEG Classroom Courses

These educational events are perfect opportunities to increase your GI knowledge.

Radislav Nakov, member of the YTG and the Education Committee explains what’s happening at UEG’s classroom courses and who should attend them.

These educational events are perfect opportunities to increase your GI knowledge but also to expand your professional network.  Find out more about the courses and how to apply. 

Work-life balance: 10 tips from the UEG Week 2018 experience 

A list of Dos and Dont's that came out of the Career Chat. 

Carolina Ciacci is a full Professor of Gastroenterology at University of Salerno (Italy), a member of the UEG Equality & Diversity Taskforce and a mother of two adult children. At UEG Week 2018, she participated in the session “Career Chat: Women as educators” and in the Facebook live chat “How to improve work-life balance for doctors?”. Based on these discussions and her own personal experience she shares her ten tips for work life balance in this edition of the GI Hive. 

The World Economic Forum Gender Gap Report of November 2017 indicated that it would take 100 years to close the gender gap at a world level1. While some academics are working towards closing the education gap, the intent to parity is yet to be translated into action on the representation and voice in other professional areas.
In the medical science field, the increasing number of women has not paralleled so far by a proportionate number of women in the leading positions, nor by a modification of the man-tailored traditional working environment in one more suitable to the modern model of family. It is believed that woman leadership can accelerate the process of women empowerment, via closing the education gap, translating the good intents into action, but mainly by identifying and removing barriers for women to succeed. 
United European Gastroenterology (UEG)’s  global vision is of promoting and providing equal opportunities and to be a place free of discrimination. The vision is supported by the UEG Equality & Diversity Task Force (E&D TF). During UEG Week 2018, the Equality & Diversity Task Force and the Young Talent Group of UEG organized the Career Chat and a Facebook live interview with the aim of supporting young gastroenterologists (GIs) to reach their goals and a satisfying work-life balance. 
Both initiatives were successful, and the discussion aimed to make both senior and young GIs conscious and creative in removing inherent barriers to succeed. It was recognized that the working set in most GI and endoscopy units is still man-modelled. However, young doctors felt the need to set up systems that help them to go through the natural life stage changes while having a satisfying career. The participants (both genders, but in the vast majority woman) expressed their need to find the right track in advancing women and making the workplace more gender-inclusive. 
In the Career Chat, was highlighted that the vast majority of the “leadership” or “career” challenges women GIs are facing are neither career nor profession related. They are emotional, often linked to the sense of guilt of not being a good parent because of the time and efforts spent at work. As a result women, especially mothers, have a sense of failure in achieving good results both at home and at work. The discussion between the senior and young participants of the Career Chat showed that to become successful and fully express their strengths and creativity, professionals independent of gender should strive to have some habits but might also need to give up some of them.

Here is a list of Do's and Dont's that came out of the Career Chat: 

  1. Make a careful analysis of your potential and find out how to empower yourself, both at work and within the family.   
  2. Set up your priorities, short and long-term goals.  Get the skills you need to succeed. Look around, find a spot for you in your working setting, fill up the empty space with expertise and knowledge.  Live up to your potential! 
  3. Choose your family partner carefully. This will help to share your family duties with him/her. Make a written list of each of your tasks. Try to set a routine for chores but know that you both need to be flexible. 
  4. Ask for help! Outsourcing is not a shame. It is hard to be on the same day on call, a mother, and a good housekeeper. Hire all the help you can afford, even if you have to pay a fee. 
  5. Make a careful plan of your expenses, since outsourcing is expensive. In some periods of your life, it is more important to spend less on entertaining and more on babysitting or housekeeping.
  6. Be efficient! Consider reducing commuting by living close to the workplace, or the kindergarten/ school. Find a gym next to your working place and go whenever you can. Check on your smartphone the time you spend on social media. You will be surprised how much time you waste scrolling the screen of your phone (yet it is sane to do that for some time!)
  7. Keep healthy! Eat well, train your body, and get a good night´s sleep. Don’t forget to look after your mind. Have a little quiet time alone. Enjoy small moments of harmony. It is vital to be fit for the daily challenges of your life.   
  8. Learn to say “no”! Saying “no” is difficult; however, you need to protect yourself from unnecessary and unfair demands that will add nothing to your personal growth and career. Be firm and protect your space.
  9. Failure is not an option (Gene Kranz, Apollo 13). Accept the possibility that sometimes in your life your career might slow down temporarily because of family engagements. Use your time at home cleverly; you might find a way to write a review or improve your knowledge in a particular field.  
  10. Do not mix up family and work. When you are at work, focus on what you are doing. Do not make unnecessary phone calls or waste time discussing your family life with your colleagues. Remember also that your colleagues may have supported you when you were on parental leave, so be helpful and available for them, too. On the other hand, if you are at home with your family limit checking your emails, or answering phone calls as much as possible. Multitasking will not work if you are striving for excellence in both fields.    
It seems that there is not a perfect recipe to achieve work-life balance. It will never be 50:50 because the amount of time and efforts to dedicate at work or at the family/social life will vary according to the personal priorities and also the times of life. In conclusion, senior and young GIs agreed with the idea that life as a physician is tough but rewarding. The recommendation is to refuse to give up being a woman and a mother. Life experience will give a woman leverage in being a physician, maybe a better one. Reference:
  1. World Economic Forum. The Global Gender Gap Report 2017

UEG Research Fellowship 

UEG YTG Member Gianluca Ianiro talks about this revolutional UEG grant for researchers.

We spoke with Gianluca Ianiro, a gastroenterologist at Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli in Rome, and a member of the UEG Young Talent Group (YTG) and UEG Research Committee

Together with the Research Committee and the YTG, Gianluca developed a new UEG grant, the UEG Research Fellowship. In 2019, UEG will award a grant of € 50,000 to a researcher so that they can spend 12 months working with a renowned European principal investigator (PI). 
The Research Fellowship is suitable for clinical or basic researchers from Europe or the Mediterranean area. Those who are in training, have completed their training or PhD within the past 3 years or already have significant research experience are eligible to apply. The Research Fellowship is highly recommended for young researchers who want the opportunity to develop their ideas in a new working environment.
Download the detailed information and criteria, and apply by no later than January 18, 2019.
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