Irritable Bowel Syndrome Spanish

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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disease seen in primary care. IBS is a multidisciplinary problem that also places a substantial burden on gastroenterologists and can require the involvement of other specialists.

This updated UEG online learning course on IBS is delivered in four modules comprising contributions from an international team of primary care and secondary care experts. Learners are invited to test their knowledge before undertaking each module and then again at the end of each module. This E-learning Course was developed in English by UEG.

The translation into other languages was generously supported with an unrestricted educational grant by Almirall.

This course is suitable for gastroenterologists, general practitioners, psychologists, psychotherapists, GI surgeons, radiologists, oncologists, physicians in training, medical students, nurses, nurse practitioners, Public Health physicians and officials, GI-related researchers, dieticians and nutritionists.

Module 1

  1. Understand how consultation skills are important in patients presenting with functional gastrointestinal disorders
  2. Accept that consultation skills can and should be learned and practiced
  3. Recall the stages of a patient consultation to improve your consultation skills
  4. Recall effective consultation models
  5. Understand verbal and non-verbal communication and their application to improve your communication skills
  6. Understand how the diagnosis of IBS is made in primary care
  7. Develop an effective management plan in the treatment of IBS in primary care
  8. Define patient centeredness in the context of IBS

Module 2

  1. Understand the patient‘s perspective of the disorder including its impact on their quality of life
  2. Define IBS with an alternating stool pattern (IBS-A) and use the definition to classify and recognise the clinical features of IBS-A
  3. Recall the epidemiology of IBS
  4. Discuss the hypotheses for the aetiopathogenesis of IBS-A
  5. Perform an effective consultation with a patient with IBS-A [changed from IBS-C here as it’s IBS-A that’s relevant here]
  6. List the important diagnostic features of IBS-A
  7. Understand the management of IBS-A in primary care, including pharmacological options

Module 3

  1. Define constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C) and use the definition to classify and recognise the clinical features of IBS-C
  2. Understand the psychological burden of IBS-C
  3. Perform an effective consultation with a patient who has IBS-C
  4. Develop an effective management plan for the treatment of IBS-C in primary and secondary care
  5. Discuss lifestyle and dietary interventions for IBS-C
  6. Recall pharmacological treatment options for IBS-C
  7. Recognise the role of HT-4 [5HT4?] receptor agonists in treatment of IBS-C

Module 4

  1. Define diarrhoea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) and use the definition to classify and recognise the clinical features of IBS-D
  2. Describe the aetiopathogenesis of IBS-D
  3. List the important steps of the diagnostic work up for IBS-D in secondary care
  4. Develop an effective management plan in the treatment of IBS-D in primary and secondary care
  5. Recall pharmacological treatment options for IBS-D
  6. Define the psychological treatments methods for IBS-D
  7. Appreciate the importance of a long-term strategy for managing IBS-D in primary care

Leading Author

Bohumil Seifert, Associate Professor of Primary Care, Department of General Practice, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

Co-Authors

Anton Emmanuel, Senior Lecturer in Neuro-Gastroenterology at University College London and Consultant Gastroenterologist at University College Hospital London, London, UK.

Carla Flik, Clinical Psychologist/Psychotherapist, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, St. Antonius Hospital, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Johann Hammer, Professor of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Vienna, Austria.

Pali Hungin, Professor of General Practice and Primary Care, Durham University, Stockton on Tees, UK.

Greg Rubin, Professor of General Practice and Primary Care, Durham University, Stockton on Tees, UK.

Robin Spiller, Professor of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

PJ Whorwell, Professor of Medicine & Gastroenterology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Niek J de Wit, Professor of General Practice, Julius Center for Health Science s and Primary Care, UMC Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Accreditation  is not foreseen.

  • The course is designed to last approximately 4–6 hours in total.
  • All patients in the simulated patient encounters are played by professional actors.
  • All authors have declared that they have no conflicts of interest in relation to the material in this course.
  • Learners are invited to test their knowledge before undertaking each module and then again at the end of each module (via problem-based questions or MCQs).
  • The course has a pass mark of 60%. You can go back and review any part of the course before you make another attempt at the test.