New e-learning developments shaping the future of gastroenterology and hepatology.

(Vienna, October 08, 2014) Ahead of UEG Week 2014, Vienna (18 October – 22nd October 2014) United European Gastroenterology (UEG) are delighted to announce their new and improved e-learning portal, providing a unique education platform with exciting innovations for the gastroenterology and hepatology community.

The UEG e-learning portal has grown exponentially and now includes thousands of categorised and searchable documents, media clips, CME courses as well as meeting content. As Dr Charles Murray, gastroenterologist at London’s Royal Free Hospital and Chair of UEG’s e-learning Taskforce, explains in the October edition of the UEG Journal, “The strength and advantage of the UEG educational platform is that the UEG Member Societies and UEG National Society Members feed into it, shaping a unique and comprehensive portal with extensive GI-related material and educational resources.” UEG provides high quality, accessible and independent education and training in gastroenterology. We carry out a range of activities, including training courses (both as e-learning and hands-on residential courses), hosting a huge online library and providing the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion. “UEG now look to improving their educational resources. We aim to do so by further engagement with Member Societies and National Societies through sharing of information, research and news and look forward to any ideas from members and specialists. UEG Education is at the beginning of an exciting stage in its development and we value input in shaping the future,” adds Dr Charles Murray. Throughout UEG Week in Vienna (18 October – 22nd October) attendees will be able to visit the UEG Education Lounge, a dedicated area at the Congress providing free access to UEG’s educational activities including the e- learning platform. UEG Week 24/7 – is a dedicated area on the UEG website, which also provides access to abstracts, e-posters and recordings from UEG Week all year round, allowing the whole gastroenterological community access to unrivalled expertise and knowledge anywhere and at any time. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099

Study finds link between depression and abnormal brain response to visceral pain in patients with IBS.

(Vienna, October 02, 2014) High rates of anxiety and depression amongst patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have led many researchers to believe there could be a causal relationship between psychological factors and IBS symptoms.

Now, scientists in Germany have found clear evidence that patients with IBS process pain signals from the gut abnormally, and that disturbed brain responses to pain are particularly pronounced in patients with more depression symptoms1.

At the 22nd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2014) in Vienna, Austria, Professor Sigrid Elsenbruch from the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany, will be presenting a new study which suggests that depression, but not anxiety, contributes to the abnormal pain processing observed in IBS in a model that addresses central pain inhibition during placebo analgesia. “Our study has shown that patients with IBS are less able to suppress pain signals in the brain coming from the bowel and that depression plays a role herein,” she says. “This study confirms the complex relationship between the gut and the brain and shows that affective disorders may contribute to the development or maintenance of disturbed pain processing in IBS.” IBS, anxiety and depression IBS is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder with prevalence rates of up to 23% reported.2 The condition is characterised by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort, in combination with bloating and altered bowel habits (e.g. diarrhoea and/or constipation). Depression and anxiety frequently co-exist with IBS, with a recent study reporting that 38% of IBS patients had clinically-confirmed depression (compared with 6% of healthy controls) and 32% had anxiety (compared with 13% of healthy controls).3 “The fact that so many people with IBS have anxiety and depression has led many to speculate that IBS is primarily a psychological, not a physical, disorder,” says Prof. Elsenbruch. “However, the condition is complex and most likely results from an interplay between psychological and biological factors. In fact, we don’t really know whether anxiety and depression result from having IBS or whether they contribute to the development or maintenance of symptoms. In many patients, both possibilities may be true at the same time.” The “brain–gut” axis in IBS There has been significant scientific interest in the role of central nervous system mechanisms along the “brain–gut” axis in IBS. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that neural processing of visceral stimuli (i.e. stimuli generated from internal organs such as the intestine) is altered in IBS, with many IBS patients showing lowered pain thresholds.4 In Prof. Elsenbruch’s latest study, painful rectal distensions were performed using a pressure-controlled barostat system in 17 patients with IBS and 17 sex- and age-matched healthy controls.1 Neural activation in pain-related brain areas was assessed using functional MRI (fMRI) while subjects received sequential intravenous administrations of saline and what they thought was an anti-spasmolytic drug (but was actually a saline placebo), in order to observe activation patterns during a typical placebo pain response. The fMRI results in the healthy volunteers demonstrated reduced neural activation in pain-related brain areas during both the saline and sham treatment (placebo), indicating significant central pain inhibition. However, there was no such inhibition in the group of IBS patients, suggesting a deficiency in central pain inhibitory mechanisms in IBS. Interestingly, higher depression (but not anxiety) scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were associated with reduced central pain inhibition in this study. “Our findings suggest that patients with IBS do not process visceral pain signals in the same way as healthy people and are unable to suppress pain signals in the brain and, as a result, experience more pain from the same stimuli,” says Prof. Elsenbruch. “The fact that the presence of depression was associated with altered brain responses suggests that depression may contribute to these abnormal pain processes in IBS patients.” References 1. SchmidJ, et al. Gut 2014. May 15. pii: gutjnl-2013-306648. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2013-306648. 2. www.aboutibs.org/site/what-is-ibs/facts/statistics 3. Shah E, et al. Ann Gastroenterol 2014;27:224-30. 4. Elsenbruch S. Brain Behav Immun 2011;25:386–94. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099 Press Release Translations Download press release Download der Pressemitteilung Descarga nota de prensa Télécharger le communiqué de presse Download comunicato stampa Download プレスリリース Download 新闻稿 

Faecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for treatment of C. difficile infection.

(September 25, 2014) The transplantation of faecal microbiota has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines.1,2

FMT has emerged as a revolutionary, potentially life-saving treatment for this common infection, and is showing promise in the management of other microbiota-related conditions.3,4

Presenting at the 22nd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2014) in Vienna, Austria, Professor Antonio Gasbarrini from the Gemeli University Hospital in Rome believes that FMT should now be used more widely in order to reduce both the clinical and economic burden of microbiota-related disease. “FMT is an old procedure that has gained in popularity in recent years,” he says. “When used in patients with recurrent C. difficile infections, which are extremely difficult to treat, FMT eradicates the bacteria in around 90% of cases with a good safety profile.” The challenges of C. difficile infection C. difficile infection is the most common cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea, and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Infection rates have been rising rapidly in Europe and reports of emerging new strains, growing antibiotic resistance, and increased susceptibility in non-hospitalized individuals are of grave concern. C. difficile infection causes severe diarrhoea, intestinal inflammation and toxin-mediated cell death that, in severe cases, can lead to shock, hypotension, ileus or megacolon. Standard first-line therapies include the antibiotics, vancomycin or metronidazole, which are initially effective in most individuals. Unfortunately, approximately 20% of successfully-treated patients will have an infection recurrence, and many of these will experience multiple recurrences.5 “Recurrent C. difficile infections are particularly difficult to treat, with long courses of antibiotics further disrupting the normal gut microflora, putting the patient at great risk of serious complications such as sepsis or perforation of the bowel,” says Prof. Gasbarrini. “There is an urgent need for more effective treatments for recurrent C. difficile infections and FMT is definitely one of them.” FMT for C. difficile infection FMT is an innovative treatment that was first described in C. difficile infection in the 1950s, and is being used increasingly in everyday practice. In FMT, healthy microbiota harvested from a donated stool sample is transplanted into the intestine of the recipient – often by colonoscopy or enema – where it helps to restore the normal composition of the gut flora and overcome the toxic consequences of C. difficile infection. Studies in patients with C. difficile infection have confirmed that the treatment has a good safety record and is highly effective – quickly eradicating recurrent infections in around 90% of patients.5,6 While once considered a last-resort option for only the brave or desperate, FMT is now officially recommended in influential European treatment guidelines for recurrent C. difficile infections.1,2 “FMT can be considered a very simple form of organ transplantation that does not require immunological matching of donor and recipient and does not need immunosuppression after the procedure,” says Prof. Gasbarrini. “I am delighted that FMT has now been formally recognised as an effective treatment for recurrent C. difficile infection and I hope the technique will now be used more widely in an effort to relieve some of the burden of this troublesome infection.” References 1. Debast SB, et al. Clin Microbiol Infect 2014; 20 (Suppl 2): 1–26. 2. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Faecal microbiota transplant for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. NICE interventional procedure guidance 485. March 2014. 3. Cammarota, et al. Intern Emerg Med 2014; 9: 365–373. 4. Smits LP, et al. Gastroenterology 2013; 145: 946–953. 5. Cammarota G, et al. J Clin Gastroenterol 2014 Jan 16. 6. Van Nood E, et al. N Engl J Med 2013; 368: 407–415. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099 Press Release Translations Download press release Download der Pressemitteilung Descarga nota de prensa Télécharger le communiqué de presse Download comunicato stampa Download プレスリリース Download 新闻稿 

Wheat-related disorders – Gluten-free diet may do more harm than good.

(September 18 , 2014) Cereals such as wheat have long been considered a fundamental food source, yet growing numbers of people are intolerant to them and the list of wheat-related conditions seems to grow daily. Now, experts are calling for a greater awareness of wheat-related disorders in order that gluten-intolerant patients are diagnosed more swiftly and receive the best possible treatment.

Cereals such as wheat have long been considered a fundamental food source, yet growing numbers of people are intolerant to them and the list of wheat-related conditions seems to grow daily. Now, experts are calling for a greater awareness of wheat-related disorders in order that gluten-intolerant patients are diagnosed more swiftly and receive the best possible treatment. According to a paper, ‘Wheat-related disorders: A broad spectrum of ‘evolving’ diseases,’ published in this month’s UEG Journal,experts Professor Giovanni Gasbarrini and Dr Francesca Mangiola suggest that people eating a gluten-free diet may also be at risk of developing new food intolerances, due to excessive substitution of alternative carbohydrates and foods containing nickel which may lead to additional health problems. They offer the following practical advice to clinicians on how to differentiate between coeliac disease and other gluten-related disorders to diagnose conditions more effectively and ensure sufferers do not follow a gluten-free diet unnecessarily: ·         Perform a thorough medical history, with particular attention given to the native gut microbiota. ·         Extensively explore the symptoms and assess the presence of any history of allergies. ·         Evaluate the genetic background with great care because it is often important to target or confirm the diagnosis and in some cases, make it unlikely. Gluten: the wheat toxin Gluten is a substance found in wheat, barley and rye that is composed of the two proteins, gliaden and glutenin. Researchers believe that gliaden is the gluten component people react to when they have wheat-related disorders. A number of distinct medical conditions are now recognised to be gluten-related including coeliac disease, wheat allergy and the newly-defined condition, non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. According to Gasbarrini and Mangiola’s paper, among the problematic disorders related to gluten, around 10% may be wheat allergy, 6% may be non-coeliac gluten sensitivity and only 1% is coeliac disease.1 Commenting on the article, UEG Spokesperson, Professor Antonio Gasbarrini said it is important to raise awareness of wheat-related disorders in order that people are not left undiagnosed and suffering. “Gluten-related disorders, like all food allergies, are extremely disabling and can have a major impact on people’s lives,” he said. “Most of us have heard of coeliac disease, but the other conditions are also very distressing and they are far more common.” “Many clinicians struggle to differentiate between the wheat-related disorders so practical advice like this is always helpful,” adds Prof. Gasbarrini. “Hopefully, as clinicians and patients become more aware of the range of conditions associated with wheat and gluten, the quicker they can be diagnosed, receive the most appropriate treatment and prevent associated health problems.” Reference 1.     Gasbarrini GB, Mangiola F. Wheat-related disorders: A broad spectrum of ‘evolving’ diseases. United European Gastroenterol J 2014;2(4):254-62. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4114114/. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including:    ·        UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion  ·         Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations ·        UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology ·        EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu

Press contact    

Samantha Forster:

Email: media@ueg.eu

Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099

 

World Digestive Health Day – 29th May 2014

Poor digestive health linked to serious mental health conditions and neurological diseases, including depression and Parkinson’s Disease.

According to scientists, gut microbiota not only play a vital role in normal digestion and protect us against infection, but also affect our behaviour, thoughts and mood.  Furthermore, recent research reveals increasing links between gut microbiota and mental health problems such as depression and anxiety as well as nervous system diseases, including Parkinson’s Disease1 and Alzheimer’s2 As World Digestive Health Day is marked across the globe today, Europe’s largest digestive health body, United European Gastroenterology (UEG), is urging people to be more symptom-aware to ensure early diagnosis and treatment, helping to prevent serious mental and neurological conditions associated with poor gut health. A study examining the link between gut microbiota and Parkinson’s Disease revealed significantly higher (54% v 8%) small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with Parkinson’s Disease than in control patients and that gastrointestinal motility abnormalities were the most likely explanation.1 “We have known for a long time that the brain can send signals to the gut, which is why stress and other emotions can contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms,” explains Professor Lakatos, digestive disease expert and UEG spokesperson. “We now know that signals can travel in the opposite direction, so it is feasible that an unhealthy gut can adversely affect the state of our mind.” Why the stomach has a ‘mind’ of its own The human intestine contains about 100 trillion micro-organisms – ten times the total number of cells in the entire human body. The activities of these organisms are controlled by what is sometimes referred to as the “little brain”, a network of nerve cells that line the intestine and help to co-ordinate gut function.  Digestive disease experts believe that consuming a healthy diet, including foods that boost ‘good bacteria’ and encourage efficient digestion, may have an especially positive effect on mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. “Although research in this area is still in its early stages, studies suggest that microbiota hold the key to improving the treatment of a wide range of mental and neurological conditions and good gut health is essential for optimal mental and physical wellbeing,” says Prof. Lakatos. References [1] Gabrielli M1, Bonazzi P, Scarpellini E, Bendia E, Lauritano EC, Fasano A, Ceravolo MG, Capecci M, Rita Bentivoglio A, Provinciali L, Tonali PA, Gasbarrini A. Prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Parkinson's disease. Mov Disord. 2011 Apr;26(5):889-92 [2] Surjyadipta Bhattacharjee, Walter J.Lukiw. Alzheimer’s disease nd the microbiome. Front Cell Neurosci. 2013; 7: 153.  Further reading Bested AC et al. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and mental health: from Metchnikoff to modern advances: part III – convergence toward clinical trials. Gut Pathogens 2013;5:4. Available at: http://www.gutpathogens.com/content/pdf/1757-4749-5-4.pdf Notes to Editors About UEG
United European Gastroenterology is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. Find out more about UEG’s work at www.ueg.eu Available for interview Peter Lakatos, MD, PhD - Associate Professor and Head of Gastroenterology at the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary. World Digestive Health Day – 29th May 2014 This year’s theme is “Gut Microbes – Importance in Health and Disease”. Healthy Gut Advice
  • Eat plenty of fibre, including beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains, fruit and
    vegetables, all of which feed good bacteria in our gut.

  • Limit sugar, processed foods, animal fats and animal protein as these provide food for unhealthy microbiota.

  • Limit the use of antibiotics, acid blockers, and anti-inflammatories where possible as these can cause an imbalance in gut flora.

  • Drink plenty of water, avoid fizzy drinks, limit your alcohol and caffeine intake.

  • Cut down on fatty, spicy or acidic foods as these can be hard to digest and irritate the stomach.

  • Boost your ‘friendly bacteria’ every day by taking a probiotic supplement or eating live yoghurt.
Watch our video on gut microbiota - Importance for Health and Disease

UEG Media Press contact    

Samantha Forster: samantha@spinkhealth.com

Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099

 

 

UEG Public Affairs Committee

Email: office@ueg.eu

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