Increase in nurse endoscopy training is vital to reduce rising numbers of colorectal cancer deaths across EU.

(June, 12, 2014) Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently estimated to claim the lives of 214,6751 adults in Europe, equivalent to 1 death every 3 minutes. With this figure predicted to rise by 12% by 2020,2 United European Gastroenterology (UEG), Europe’s largest digestive health body, calls for an urgent increase in screening uptake and the availability of more trained nurse endoscopists across Europe, to prevent rising mortality.

Colorectal cancer is extremely lethal in its advanced stages yet early detection can result in a 90-95% survival rate. Regular screening reduces the risk of dying from the disease by 20-30% using the Faecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) and it is well established that patients who are maintained free of adenomas by endoscopic polypectomy are generally kept cancer free3.  In fact, recent studies have also suggested that endoscopic screening is associated with a substantial reduction in mortality specifically from colorectal cancer and has a more preventive effect than FOBT screening.4 However, there is currently a considerable lack of nurse endoscopy workforce in the majority of European countries, and the main provider of endoscopy in many countries remains with the physician.  Sweden and the UK are the only European countries to have nurse endoscopists available nationally and Denmark and the Netherlands have nurse endoscopists but just in certain regions.5   United European Gastroenterology (UEG) welcome the vital steps the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) are taking to transform nurse endoscopy training and provision across Europe. Michael Ortmann, President of the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) explains; “We have established a European Endoscopy Nurses Forum (EENF) which has allowed collaboration between European countries to establish a harmonised training programme for endoscopy nurses and allowed standardisation of the role of endoscopy nurses across Europe, including training requirements, which will have a significant impact on the reduction of colorectal cancer deaths.” ESGENA in combination with ESGE (European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy) and the Austrian Society of Endoscopy and GE Nurses and Assistants (IVEPA), will be hosting a conference as part of UEG Week (18-22 October 2014) in Vienna, offering high quality hands on training in small groups and live transmissions for nurses to improve their endoscopic skills. Under the supervision of highly experienced tutors, participants will have the opportunity to take part in valuable training using on bio simulators and also have the opportunity to perform endoscopic techniques on colonoscopy as well as ERCP. Notes to Editors References: 1. Globocan Estimated Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence, 2012  2. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) 3. Winawer SJ, Zauber AG, O’Brien MJ. Randomised comparison of surveillance intervals after colonoscopic removal of newly diagnosed adenomatous polyps. N Engl J Med 1993; 328: 901-906 4. Young P.E, Womeldorph C.M. Colonoscopy for Colorectal Cancer Screening J Cancer 2013; 4 (3):217-226.  5. Kanavos P, Schurer W. The burden of colorectal cancer: prevention, treatment and quality of services. Eur J Health Econ 2010; 10 Suppl 1:S1-3 About UEG United European Gastroenterology is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. Find out more about UEG’s work at www.ueg.eu 18th ESGENA Conference at UEG Week (October 18-22 2014), Vienna, Austria Hosted by the Austrian Society of Endoscopy and GE Nurses and Assistants (IVEPA) The ESGENA conference is not only an opportunity to meet colleagues from throughout Europe, but also from North and South America, Africa, Asia and Australia. The exchange with nurses from all over the world combined with the opportunity to attend the medical programme of the UEG Week ensures the ESGENA conference is an exceptional educational event. See www.ueg.eu/week/esgena/ for further information and registration details Available for interview Michael Ortmann, ESGENA president  #screeningsaveslives Download a map of CRC Incidence & Mortality in Europe here http://www.ueg.eu/crcmap/ and an infographic about CRC screening here http://www.ueg.eu/crceurope/ Press contact Samantha Forster media@ueg.eu Tel:+44(0)1444811099 @UEGMedia

Family doctor intervention is crucial in the fight against Europe’s second biggest cancer killer.

(April, 30, 2014) As healthcare professionals, commissioners and politicians from across Europe convened earlier this month for the third ‘European Colorectal Cancer Days’ meeting in Brno in the Czech Republic, one of the meeting’s supporters, United European Gastroenterology (UEG) is calling for increased intervention from primary care physicians to improve colorectal cancer (CRC) screening uptake rates across Europe.

CRC is currently estimated to claim the lives of 214,6751 adults in Europe – equivalent to 1 death every 3 minutes – and is expected to affect 502,000 Europeans a year by 20202.  CRC screening programmes are currently underused with the uptake throughout much of Europe falling way short of the 65% rate considered desirable by the European Commission. With the annual incidence of Europe’s second most lethal cancer killer predicted to rise by 12% by 20202 UEG is raising awareness that screening saves lives and believes that family doctor intervention is key to preventing rising mortality. “Family doctors play a crucial role in the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer by raising the subject of screening with eligible adults and explaining the benefits of available screening options,” explains UEG President Professor Michael Farthing. “Research has found that lack of recommendation by a family doctor is a key barrier to colorectal cancer screening uptake. By proactively broaching the subject of screening, general practitioners can overcome common fears and misconceptions as well as the embarrassment factor that so often prevents people talking about and participating in CRC screening.” Colorectal cancer is extremely lethal in its advanced stages yet early detection can result in a 90-95% survival rate. Regular screening reduces the risk of dying from the disease by 20-30% using the Faecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT), 50% using flexible sigmoidoscopy and up to 65% using colonoscopy. Widely available across Europe, the FOBT is generally offered to men and women over the age of 50 via an invitation from their doctor or a national screening programme. The involvement of family doctors in CRC screening in Europe varies. In some countries (Germany, France, the Czech Republic), family doctors actually perform FOB testing in their surgeries; in others, they are tasked with recruiting patients for colonoscopic screening (Poland); while in countries such as the UK and the Netherlands, family doctors are not directly involved in screening but instead are required to encourage patients to participate in national programmes and to advise on the importance of screening. “It is very important in countries with active screening programmes in place that comprehensive colorectal cancer education and support for family doctors is available to help them put screening high on the agenda at a practice level. Motivated and well informed doctors will in turn mobilise patients, and the link between patient screening compliance and practitioner motivation is well documented,” explains Professor Farthing. #screeningsaveslives Which patient groups do/don’t participate in CRC screening?
  • Research has found a higher participation rate of women in FOBT-based screening programmes across Europe than in men.3
  • Age is also a factor. Italian research found that men and women aged 65 years or older were more likely to participate in screening than younger invitees.4
  • Smokers have been found to have poor CRC screening adherence compared to non-smokers and former smokers.5
  • Adherence to other screening programmes e.g. prostate cancer (men) and breast cancer (women) has been positively associated with CRC screening uptake.6
  • Research in Spain found that fear of screening tests and embarrassment were the main barriers that contributed to low participation.7
  • Notes to Editors

    About UEG
    United European Gastroenterology is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy.
    Find out more about UEG’s work at www.ueg.eu

    Press contact

    Samantha Forster media@ueg.eu Tel:+44(0)1444811099 @UEGMedia

    References

    [1] Globocan Estimated Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence, 2012

    [2] International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)

    [3] M.Von Euler-Cheplin, K.Brasso and E.Lynge, "Determinants of Participation in CRC screening with faecal occult blood testing," Journal of Public Health

    [4] N.Segnan, C. Senore, B. Andreoni et al, "Randomized trial of different screening strategies for colorectal cancer: patient response and detection rates," Journal of the National Cancer Institute

    [5] G.N. Ioannou, M. K. Chapko and J. A. Dominitz, "Predictors of CRC screening participation in the USA," American Journal of Gastroenterology

    [6] R. C. Carlos, A. M. Fendrick, J. Ellis and S. J. Bernstein, "Can breast and cervical cancer screening visits be used to enhance colorectal cancer screening?" Journal of American College of Radiology

    [7] A. Z. Gimeno-Garcia, E Quintero, D Nicolas Perez, A Parra-Blanco and A. Jimenez-Sosa, "Impact of an educational video-based strategy on the behaviour process associated with colorectal cancer screening: a randomized controlled study", Cancer Epidemiology

     

    Colorectal cancer in Europe facts

    Colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in Europe

     

Europe is falling behind America in the fight against colorectal cancer.

(March 13, 2014) Annual incidence of Europe’s second most lethal cancer killer is predicted to rise by 12% by 20201 warns Europe’s largest body of gastroenterology experts, United European Gastroenterology (UEG). Colorectal cancer is estimated to claim the lives of 214,6752 adults in Europe and is expected to affect 502,000 Europeans a year by 20201.

Colorectal cancer is extremely lethal in its advanced stages yet early detection can result in a 90-95% survival rate. Early signs of colorectal cancer do not exist or are difficult to spot but can be detected via a simple screening test (the Faecal Occult Blood Test) that can be performed at home. Widely available across Europe, the FOBT is generally offered to men and women over the age of 50 via an invitation from their doctor or a national screening programme. However, uptake throughout Europe has been surprisingly low, with the percentage of eligible adults screened in many countries falling way short of the 65% rate considered desirable by the European Commission and already achieved in the USA3.

While Europe’s promotion of organised national screening programmes is seen as preferable to America’s ‘opportunistic’ approach, UEG experts say Europe can learn from the USA when it comes to pushing CRC to the forefront of public life. Annual campaigns fronted by Meryl Streep and other Hollywood stars, nationwide ‘Dress in Blue Days’ and a White House colorectal cancer statement issued by President Obama earlier this month are all helping to raise the profile of the disease and the importance of screening across the Atlantic. “United European Gastroenterology has campaigned for screening for colorectal cancer to be available to all European citizens; we are now urging the European population to participate and to be aware that FOBT screening reduces the risk of dying from colorectal cancer by 20-30%. Colorectal cancer is treatable when detected early, yet it is estimated to claim the lives of over 500 Europeans every day,” says British gastroenterologist and UEG President, Professor Michael Farthing. As the world marks Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month (March) UEG is launching a new awareness campaign, ‘Screening Saves Lives’, urging all European men and women over 50 to talk to a healthcare professional and undertake screening for colorectal cancer. #screeningsaveslives Notes to Editors

About UEG
United European Gastroenterology is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy.
Find out more about UEG’s work at www.ueg.eu Press contact Samantha Forster media@ueg.eu Tel:+44(0)1444811099 @UEGMedia References 1 International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) 2 Globocan Estimated Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence, 2012 3 Overall USA screening rate, Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, 2010 Download press release Colorectal cancer in Europe facts Colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in Europe How to spot colorectal cancer symptoms

Europe's Most Common Cancer

The prognosis for CRC is relatively good compared with other GI malignancies. However, mortality is continuing to increase in many eastern European countries.

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