One in 10 IBS with diarrhoea patients wish they were dead when their condition is bad

 

(Vienna, August 7, 2018) Eleven percent of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D) patients reveal that they suffer from suicidal thinking when their condition is bad, a new study has found.

The research, published in the UEG Journal, assessed the burden associated with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea by surveying 513 patients and 679 healthcare professionals. A quarter of patients reported that IBS stops them from enjoying life and 11% agreed with the statement; ‘when my IBS is bad, I wish I was dead’. IBS is a functional bowel disorder, characterised by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. The disease affects 11% of adults globally, of whom one third experience diarrhoea as the predominant symptom. IBS-D is considered to be a brain-gut interaction disorder and a range of treatment approaches have been proposed, including diet and lifestyle modifications, probiotics and fibre supplements and various prescription and over-the-counter medications. Over a third of patients reported that they ‘constantly’ worry about whether and when their IBS symptoms will return and one in five stated that IBS had negatively affected their working life. Patients also revealed that, on average, they spend 18 days per month experiencing fatigue or a lack of energy. Half of patients reported that they would use a daily treatment for the rest of their life if it prevented their IBS symptoms (49%) and a ‘willingness to try anything’ to improve their condition (46%). Despite these alarming statistics, the survey outlined that one third of IBS patients do not think that healthcare professionals take the disease seriously and should provide more support in disease management. When reviewing the attitudes of healthcare professionals towards IBS, results showed that two-thirds agreed that patients should feel listened to and supported, with the vast majority stating that the main aim of their care when managing IBS is significantly improving their patients’ quality of life. Professor Hans Törnblom, lead author of the study, comments on the findings, “IBS can be an extremely tough, emotional and difficult condition to live with and, in addition to dedicating resources to improve the physical burden of IBS, it is essential that care and investment is committed to providing psychological and emotional support for patients. This should come from multi-disciplined healthcare professionals, as well as family members, friends and colleagues.” “The majority of IBS sufferers do not seek medical advice for their condition” added Professor Törnblom. “Of those that do speak to a healthcare professional, it is clear that there are high levels of dissatisfaction with the level of care that they currently receive. Healthcare professionals experience a degree of uncertainty and complexity in managing IBS patients and the research indicates the need for higher levels of communication between care providers and patients to facilitate improved patient outcomes.” References: Understanding symptom burden and attitudes to irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea: Results from patient and healthcare professional surveys. UEG Journal. Published July 2018. Lacy BE, Mearin F, Chang L, et al. Bowel disorders. Gastroenterology 2016; 150: 1393–1407. Lovell RM and Ford AC. Global prevalence of and risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome: A meta-analysis. Clinical Gastroenterol Hepatology 2012; 10: 712–721. Notes to Editors
For further information, to view the full paper or to arrange an expert interview, please contact Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu About Professor Hans Törnblom
Professor Hans Törnblom is from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden and is a member of the UEG Public Affairs Committee. About UEG
UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 25,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including:
  • UEG Week, the biggest congress of its kind in Europe, and one of the two largest in the world.
  • UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion
  • Activity Grants, promoting and funding educational projects in the field of digestive health to advance and harmonise the training and continuing education of professionals
  • UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology
  • EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe
  • Quality of Care, European-based and English clinical practice guidelines, clinical standards, consensus, position papers and standard protocols in the field of digestive health, are available in the repository.
Find out more about UEG’s work by visiting www.ueg.eu or contact:
Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

UEG Week: Clinicians welcome new initiatives to help improve outcomes for patients with functional GI disorders

(Vienna, October 18, 2016) European clinicians and research scientists attending UEG Week 2016 have welcomed the publication of new criteria for the diagnosis and classification of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, together with the launch of several major initiatives designed to enhance understanding of these disorders and help clinicians in the care of their patients. Delegates attending UEG Week in Vienna embraced the initiatives, which have been inspired by publication of the new Rome IV criteria for functional GI disorders and were showcased today by Dr Douglas A. Drossman, the current President of the Rome Foundation.  

Speaking at UEG Week, Dr Drossman outlined the need to update the definitions and conceptual understanding of functional GI disorders, leading to the development of the Rome IV classification and the research and educational initiatives that have followed. “The Rome III criteria were published in 2006 and, in the last 10 years, we have seen unprecedented progress in our understanding of functional GI disorders and now have better treatments available for many of them,” he said. “In developing the Rome IV criteria, we wanted to include new diagnoses, emphasize the importance of the gut­–brain interaction in the pathophysiology of these conditions, and improve their diagnosis and treatment using new learning tools.”

We now want to help clinicians in Europe and around the world to understand the new criteria, integrate them into their own diagnostic work-ups and optimize their patient management.

What’s new in Rome IV?

The Rome IV criteria contain a number of major changes, which were based on both new evidence and expert consensus. Major changes in Rome IV include: 

  • The redefinition of functional GI disorders as ‘disorders of the gut–brain interaction’ and the removal of the term, ‘functional’ when not needed.
  • The addition of new diagnoses, including opioid-induced constipation, narcotic bowel syndrome, cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome and reflux hypersensitivity.
  • Threshold changes for diagnostic criteria to improve their clinical meaningfulness.
  • Revision of sphincter of Oddi (SOD) disorder criteria
  • Reconceptualization of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and its sub-types, with removal of the term ‘discomfort’ from its diagnostic criteria. 

“These changes reflect our growing understanding of many different aspects of functional GI disorders and they should help support future research and enhance clinical practice,” said Dr Drossman. “We now want to help clinicians in Europe and around the world to understand the new criteria, integrate them into their own diagnostic work-ups and optimize their patient management.” 

To aid in the communication of the Rome IV concepts to clinicians, the educational materials have been published as the Rome IV 2-volume textbook and also supplementary clinically oriented books. These include diagnostic algorithms, multimodal treatment using the Multi-Dimensional Clinical Profile, as well as paediatric and primary care books. “In this manner, the clinician can find the book that is best targeted to his or specific interests” said Dr Drossman. 

Rome IV Interactive Clinical Decision Toolkit

As a means to further reach the needs of clinicians, the Rome Foundation has been working with new software to develop a powerful on-line, interactive toolkit that presents a combination of Rome IV diagnostic algorithms and Multidimensional Clinical Profile (MDCP) treatment guidelines. The toolkit guides clinicians through the complex challenges of working with patients with functional GI disorders, with users seeing all relevant decision pathways, and, by inputting their patients’ information, activating the pathways that lead to treatment recommendations for optimal outcomes. 

“Both the Rome IV diagnostic criteria and the MDCP guidelines are innovative in their learning approaches and we are pleased to have been able to combine these approaches in this interactive on-line toolkit,” explained Dr Drossman. “We anticipate that clinicians will be able to develop a more comprehensive knowledge and optimize the care of their patients by accessing the most up-to-date information developed by world experts.” 

Access the release in German (PDF)
Access the release in English (PDF)

References

1.    Drossman DA, Chang L, Chey WD, Kellow J, Tack J, Whitehead WE (eds). Rome IV functional gastrointestinal disorders: disorders of gut–brain interaction. Raleigh, NC: Rome Foundation, 2016.

2.    Drossman DA, Chang L, Chey WD, Kellow J, Tack J, Whitehead WE and the Rome IV Committees (eds). Rome IV Multidimensional Clinical Profile for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (2nd edition). Raleigh, NC: Rome Foundation, 2016. 

Notes to Editors

For further information, or to arrange an interview with Dr Douglas Drossman, please contact Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

About Dr Douglas Drossman

Dr Drossman is the current President of the Rome Foundation and his research relates to the clinical, epidemiological, psychosocial and treatment aspect of functional GI disorders. He has served as the Associated Editor of the journal Gastroenterology and has written over 500 articles and book chapters. 

About Professor Magnus Simren (UEG Spokesperson)

Professor Magnus Simren is the Chair of the UEG Scientific Committee and is a Consultant in the Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Professor Simren also sits on the Rome IV Committee, within the Microbiota Working Team.

About UEG Week

UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress, attracting up to 13,000 participants from 116 countries. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning.

About UEG

UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge.

To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including: 

  • UEG Week, the biggest congress of its kind in Europe, and one of the two largest in the world.
  • UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion
  • Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations
  • UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology
  • EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe

Find out more about UEG’s work by visiting www.ueg.eu or contact:           

Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

Follow UEG on Twitter

UEG Week: New breakthrough for IBS patients 

(Vienna, October 18, 2016) A low-FODMAP diet is now an established treatment for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the diet is controversial and challenging to follow, and not all IBS sufferers have a positive response to the intervention. Today, scientists at UEG Week have announced that bacterial profiles in the faeces differ between people who do and do not respond to a low-FODMAP diet, allowing doctors to predict who might benefit most from using the diet. 

Presenting their findings for the first time at the opening session of UEG Week 2016, Dr Sean Bennet from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, told delegates that, in the right people, a low-FODMAP diet can be highly effective, but identifying those individuals is currently impossible. “A low-FODMAP diet has been shown in a recent clinical trial to significantly reduce the symptoms of IBS in around half of the people who tried it,” he said. “Unfortunately, this is a very demanding diet that requires the exclusion of entire food groups, so we have been looking at ways to predict who will gain the greatest benefit from trying it.”

Being able to predict if a patient is unlikely to respond to a low-FODMAP diet means that other therapies could be discussed earlier, and these patients could be spared a demanding diet that might have no effect, or even worsen, their symptoms.

What is the low-FODMAP diet?

Dietary interventions are considered to be first-line treatments for patients with IBS. A ‘traditional’ IBS diet focusses on optimizing eating patterns and reducing the intake of specific foodstuffs that are known to worsen symptoms in some people. The low-FODMAP (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) diet requires restriction of certain carbohydrates, including foods such as wheat, barley, onion and legumes, foods rich in free fructose (including many fruits), and artificially sweetened products.

“We know that the low-FODMAP diet is effective in many IBS patients, but we also know that the diet can alter the composition of the gut bacteria,” said Dr Bennet. “We wanted to compare the effects of the ‘traditional’ and low-FODMAP diets on the gut bacteria and see whether the bacterial profiles can be used to predict patient response to each treatment.” 

Predicting low-FODMAP diet responders: latest research

The study* presented today by Dr Bennet and colleagues involved an analysis of data from 61 patients with moderately severe or severe IBS symptoms who took part in a previous clinical trial. In that trial, patients followed a ‘traditional’ or low-FODMAP diet for 4 weeks, with faecal samples collected before and after the dietary interventions. Bacterial profiling of the samples found differences in the impact of each diet on the gut bacteria composition and also revealed that the faecal bacterial profiles differed between patients who responded to the low-FODMAP diet and those who did not. 

“Patients who did not respond to the low-FODMAP diet were found to have more abnormalities in their gut bacterial profiles before they started the diet than those who responded to the diet,” said Dr Bennet. “This raises the possibility that faecal bacterial profiling could be undertaken before dietary interventions are considered. 

“Being able to predict if a patient is unlikely to respond to a low-FODMAP diet means that other therapies could be discussed earlier, and these patients could be spared a demanding diet that might have no effect, or even worsen, their symptoms.”

*This study was selected as one of the top five abstracts submitted to UEG Week 2016

Access the release in German (PDF)
Access the release in English (PDF)

References 

1.    Böhn L, Störsrud S, Liljebo T et al. Diet low in FODMAPs reduces symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome as well as traditional dietary advice: a randomized controlled trial. Gastroenterology 2015;149(6):1399­–1407.

2.    Halmos EP, Power VA, Shepherd SI et al. A diet low in FODMAPs reduces symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Gastroenterology 2014;146(1):67–75.

3.    Halmos EP, Christophersen CT, Bird AR et al. Diets that differ in their FODMAP content alter the colonic luminal microenvironment. Gut 2015;64(1):93-100.

4.    Bennet SMP, Böhn L, Störsrud S et al. Multivariate modelling of gut microbial profiles predicts responsiveness to a diet low in FODMAPs. Oral presentation at UEG Week 2016, 15–19 October, Vienna, Austria. Abstract 3474.

Notes to Editors

For further information, or to arrange an interview with Dr Sean Bennet, please contact Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

About Dr Sean Bennet

Dr Bennet is from the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. His study on gut microbial profiles and low-FODMAP diets has been selected as one of the top five abstracts submitted to UEG Week Vienna 2016: https://www.ueg.eu/awards-grants/ueg-week-awards/top-abstract-prize/

About Professor Hans Törnblom

Professor Törnblom is a member of the UEG Public Affairs Committee and is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

About UEG Week

UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress, attracting up to 13,000 participants from 116 countries. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning.

About UEG

UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge.

To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including: 

  • UEG Week, the biggest congress of its kind in Europe, and one of the two largest in the world.
  • UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion
  • Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations
  • UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology
  • EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe

Find out more about UEG’s work by visiting www.ueg.eu or contact:           

Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

Follow UEG on Twitter

UEG Week: Zonulin in the spotlight as researchers find new link with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity and IBS

(Barcelona, October 28, 2015) The intriguing story of the recently-discovered protein, zonulin, advances a chapter today as Italian scientists announce the results of their latest research linking zonulin with two common inflammatory bowel conditions.

The researchers have discovered that people with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have higher than normal blood levels of zonulin, suggesting an important role for the protein in the development of these conditions. Speaking at the 23rd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2015) in Barcelona, Spain, Professor Giovanni Barbara from the University of Bologna said the results may lead to new treatment strategies for these conditions. “We were intrigued to find that blood levels of zonulin were almost as high in patients with NCGS as in those with coeliac disease,” he said.  Zonulin in autoimmune disease Zonulin is a type of protein (a haptoglobin) that was discovered in 2000 by a team of researchers at Maryland School of Medicine in the USA. The protein is found within intestinal cells and it is the only human protein discovered so far that regulates the permeability of the intestine. Zonulin has been called a “tight junction regulator”, as it controls the size of the gaps between the intestinal cells and orchestrates the passage of nutrients, water and cells into and out of the gut. Scientists have found that zonulin is produced and released by triggers including intestinal bacterial infections and gluten, and a link between zonulin and coeliac disease has already been established. In the presence of zonulin, the normally tight junctions between the intestinal cells remain open, creating bowel “leakiness” and initiating an inflammatory cascade that eventually damages the intestinal wall. “Increased intestinal permeability has been implicated in a range of autoimmune conditions including coeliac disease, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis,” explained Prof. Barbara. “Since zonulin is a key regulator of intestinal permeability, it is possible that this protein provides a common link between all these conditions.”  Zonulin in NCGS and IBS In the latest study, the team from Bologna recruited patients with NCGS (n=27), diarrhoea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) (n=15), coeliac disease (n=15) and healthy volunteers (n=15) and they measured their blood levels of zonulin.1 The highest zonulin levels were found in the patients with coeliac disease (mean 0.033 ng/mg), followed by those with NCGS (mean 0.030 ng/mg) and IBS-D (mean 0.012 ng/mg). The mean level in the healthy volunteers was only 0.007 ng/mg. In the patients with NCGS, blood levels of zonulin fell significantly when they were eating a gluten-free diet. “This study has increased our understanding of zonulin and how it might contribute to the development of these common and disabling bowel conditions,” said Prof. Barbara. “Hopefully, our work will lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with these and possibly other autoimmune conditions.” Access this press release in Spanish Notes to Editors  For further information, or to arrange an interview with Professor Barbara, please contact Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including: 
  • UEG Week, the biggest congress of its kind in Europe, and one of the two largest in the world.
  • UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion
  • Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations
  • UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology
  • EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe 
Find out more about UEG’s work by visiting www.ueg.eu or contact: Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @UEGMedia References 1. Barbaro MR, et al. The role of zonulin in non-celiac gluten sensitivity and irritable bowel syndrome. Abstract presented at the 23rd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2015), October 24–27 2015, Barcelona, Spain. 2. Fasano A. Ann NY Acad Sci 2012;1258:25–33.

UEG Week: Faecal microbiota transplantation now available in capsule form

(Barcelona, October 6, 2015) A new capsule form of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has raised hopes that this effective treatment for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and other bowel conditions might soon become mainstream.

A recently-reported study confirmed that capsules containing a frozen suspension of faecal material harvested from healthy unrelated donors was well tolerated and effectively resolved diarrhoea in 90% of patients with difficult-to-treat C. difficile infection. Professor Antonio Gasbarrini from the A. Gemelli University Hospital in Rome, Italy, who will be presenting his research at the 23rd United European Gastroenterology Week in Barcelona, Spain later this month, believes that an oral formulation that simplifies FMT is a major step forward. “FMT is an excellent treatment for C. difficile infection, but traditional methods are time-consuming and technically challenging,” he says. “Advances in the preparation and delivery of FMT will lead to its wider acceptance as a safe and effective treatment for C. difficile infection that could supersede antibiotics.” C. difficile infection challenges C. difficile infection is a type of bacterial infection that causes severe diarrhoea, intestinal inflammation and cell death. The infection is spread via the ingestion of spores, which are passed out of the body in the faeces and can survive for many weeks or months. Standard therapy for C. difficile infection includes the use of antibiotics, however, around one-third of individuals will have a recurrent infection and many of these will have multiple recurrences. The consequences of recurrences of C. difficile infection can be severe, resulting in life-threatening illness and frequent hospitalisations. FMT in C. difficile infection FMT from a healthy donor to an individual with C. difficile infection can restore the healthy gut microbiota and resolve symptoms. FMT has traditionally been performed using a liquid suspension of faeces from a related donor, which is transplanted into the body using a nasogastric tube, endoscopy, enema or colonoscopy. A recent systematic review of the literature concluded that FMT was both effective and safe for the treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection, yet many hospitals have failed to embrace the technique or offer it as a potential treatment option. “We believe that FMT is an excellent therapeutic option for patients who have failed to respond to antibiotic treatments or who have severe or multiple recurrences,” said Prof. Gasbarrini. “Traditional routes of administration all have their drawbacks, so we are excited by the prospect of a capsule formulation.” In the recently-reported study of an FMT capsule, researchers in the US recruited 20 patients with C. difficile infection who had either failed to respond to antibiotic medications or had been hospitalized at least twice as a result of severe symptoms. The capsules were prepared using frozen liquid stool samples from carefully screened unrelated donors and administered to the patients on two consecutive days. After the first 2 days of treatment, 14 of the 20 patients (70%) experienced a resolution of their symptoms and remained symptom free for 8 weeks. After a second course of treatment, four of the remaining patients became symptom free, resulting in an overall 90% rate of symptom resolution. “Although larger studies are needed to confirm these findings, this study could certainly lead to more widespread use of FMT in the treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection,” said Prof. Gasbarrini.  Access this press release in Spanish Notes to Editors  For further information, or to arrange an interview with Professor Gasbarrini, please contact Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. Press may register for UEG Week by following this link or calling the UEG Media Team on +44 (0)1444 811099 About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including: 
  • UEG Week, the biggest congress of its kind in Europe, and one of the two largest in the world.
  • UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion
  • Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations
  • UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology
  • EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe 
Find out more about UEG’s work by visiting www.ueg.eu or contact: Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @UEGMedia References 1.     Youngster I, et al. JAMA 2014;312(17):1772–78 2.     Cammarota G, et al. J Clin Gastroenterol 2014; 48(8):693–702.

UEG launch #FaceUp2CRC campaign to raise awareness of colorectal cancer

(Vienna, 15 September, 2015) Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common type of gastrointestinal cancer in Europe, with estimates of more than 300,000 new cases recorded in the EU every year. It accounts for approximately half of all GI malignancies in Europe, and the annual incidence is predicted to rise 12% by 2020.

Although most cases of CRC are diagnosed in the over 50’s, recent findings have also suggested that the risk of young people developing CRC is increasing at an alarming rate, highlighting the need for greater CRC awareness across all age groups. With early detection resulting in a 90-95% survival rate, United European Gastroenterology (UEG) has launched the ‘#FaceUp2CRC’ campaign and is calling for medical professionals to unite and create a movement to help raise awareness of CRC, encouraging members of the public to undertake screening. UEG is calling for medical professionals to share their ‘selfie’ and post this online with the hashtag #FaceUp2CRC. Supporters are invited to be as creative as they like and are encouraged to ‘face up’ to their camera whilst posting their message. UEG President Professor Michael Farthing explains “colorectal cancer is treatable when detected early, yet it claims the lives of hundreds of people across Europe every day. We hope that the GI community will come together to help us with this campaign to help raise awareness of CRC and improve screening uptake and survival rates across Europe”. Current rates for CRC screening programmes vary from as little as 15% in areas of Poland and just 22% in Belgium to a healthier rate of 64% in Norway and 70% in Finland. However, uptake generally throughout Europe remains alarmingly low, with the percentage of eligible adults screened in many countries falling considerably short of the 65% rate considered desirable by the European commission. UEG will be promoting the campaign on Twitter, Thunderclap and throughout UEG Week Barcelona 2015. To find out more about UEG Week, please visit: https://www.ueg.eu/week/ #FaceUp2CRC Notes to Editors About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including:
  • UEG Week, the biggest congress of its kind in Europe, and one of the two largest in the world. MEDIA REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
  • UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion
  • Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations
  • UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology
  • EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe 
Find out more about UEG’s work by visiting www.ueg.eu or contact: Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu  References 1.     Roberts SE, Samuel DG, Williams JG, et al. Survey of Digestive Health across Europe. Part one: The burden of gastrointestinal diseases and the organisation and delivery of gastroenterology services across Europe. Report for United European Gastroenterology. October 2014. 2.     International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)

Delayed diagnosis of coeliac disease may put lives at risk: is screening the solution?

(April 23, 2015) Coeliac disease is one of the most common life-long conditions in Europe, yet many people remain undiagnosed and lengthy diagnostic delays may be putting lives at risk.

Today, doctors are being urged to consider testing for Coeliac disease in anyone showing signs and symptoms of the condition and to consider screening everyone in high-risk groups. A paper published in this month’s special Coeliac disease (CD) issue of the UEG Journal (https://www.ueg.eu/journal/) assessed the viability of screening for CD in the general population and concluded that screening of first-degree relatives of people with CD, people with type 1 diabetes, iron-deficiency anaemia, Down’s syndrome and other high-risk groups may be appropriate. “This important research highlights the value of serological testing for CD in anyone with symptoms that might be due to the condition and in all asymptomatic individuals from high-risk groups,” says Professor Antonio Gasbarrini from the Gemelli University Hospital in Rome, Italy. “It is vital that we now start to take positive action across Europe to tackle this prevalent condition and reduce its serious health consequences.” A diagnosis of CD is usually made based on the presence of antibodies to gluten in the blood in addition to biopsy evidence of inflammation in the small intestine. However, the availability of sensitive and specific blood tests for markers of CD has raised the possibility of population-wide screening for CD in an effort to ensure earlier diagnosis and treatment of the condition. “Coeliac disease is readily treated with a gluten-free diet, so it is unacceptable that people suffer its symptoms for many years before they are properly diagnosed” says Professor Gasbarrini. “We now have blood screening tests that are simple, safe and accurate, and it is time we started using them effectively to limit the damage caused by this common condition.” Coeliac disease is a genetically-determined, autoimmune condition caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten found in wheat, barley and rye. The condition causes inflammation in the small intestine, leading to diarrhoea, weight loss, fatigue and other non-specific symptoms. It has been estimated that around 1% of the population may have CD, although estimates vary between countries, and the prevalence of CD appears to be increasing. If left undiagnosed and untreated, CD can have a profound effect on quality of life, may lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes, and has been associated with a reduced life-expectancy. “Unfortunately, because the symptoms of CD are often vague and similar to those of irritable bowel syndrome, many people with CD are undiagnosed and many who are diagnosed will have waited 10 years or more for their diagnosis to be confirmed,” says Prof. Gasbarrini. “At best, only around one-quarter of all CD sufferers are likely to have been diagnosed by a physician, leaving large numbers of people still at risk.” Notes to Editors About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including: · UEG Week, the biggest congress of its kind in Europe, and one of the two largest in the world. MEDIA REGISTRATION NOW OPEN · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu

Press contact    

Luke Paskins:

media@ueg.eu

Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099

References

1.     Ludvigsson JF, Card TR, Kaukinen K, et al. UEG Journal 2015;3(2):106-120.

2.     Ludvigsson JF, Bai JC, Biagi F, et al. Gut 2013; 62:43-52.

3.     Norström F, Lindholm L, Sandström O, et al. BMC Gastroenterol 2011;11:118.

4.     Khashan AS, Henriksen TB, Mortensen PB, et al. Hum Reprod 2010;25(2):528-34.

5.     Rubio-Tapia A, Kyle RA, Kaplan EL, et al. Gastroenterology 2009;137(1):88-93.

6.     Mustalahti K, Catassi C, Reunanen A, et al. Ann Med 2010;42:587-95.

 

Vice President of UEG to advise European Commission on medical research policies.

(Vienna, March 12, 2015) The Scientific Panel for Health was recently constituted to assume its official role of advising the European Commission on medical research policy.

Among the members of this newly created body is the Vice President of United European Gastroenterology (UEG), Professor Michael Manns. He accepted his nomination by the European Commission to contribute his expertise in the field of digestive and liver health. The Scientific Panel for Health was established by the European Commission to provide scientific guidance for research and innovation in health under the current funding programme of the European Union, ‘Horizon 2020’. Its task is to identify obstacles to medical innovation, recommend research priorities, and propose strategies for their effective implementation. The Panel’s 27 members comprise distinguished researchers from different medical disciplines and stakeholder communities who have displayed expertise in health research and innovation. The nomination of Professor Manns is testament to the importance of digestive and liver diseases as a growing public health concern that affects an increasing number of EU citizens. “Gastrointestinal disorders are a major threat to public health and are responsible for almost 500,000 deaths per year in Europe alone. The political priorities we take today will directly affect citizens across Europe for years to come. It is important for medical research policies to respond to such threats, and the Scientific Panel for Health will be important in helping EU decision makers shape policies that are conducive to innovative research”, says Professor Manns. Professor Michael Manns is Vice President of UEG and heads the Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology at the Medical School of Hannover, Germany. He has a longstanding interest in viral and autoimmune liver diseases, hepatocellular carcinoma and gastrointestinal oncology. His experience in health innovation includes founding a national viral hepatitis network for Germany and he has been a spokesperson for German research initiatives in hepatology and transplantation. Click here for further information on the Scientific Panel for Health.  Notes to Editors: References 1. Roberts SE, Samuel DG, Williams JG, et al. Survey of Digestive Health across Europe. Part one: The burden of gastrointestinal diseases and the organisation and delivery of gastroenterology services across Europe. Report for United European Gastroenterology. August 2014. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. UEG is a member of the Alliance for Biomedical Research in Europe, a consortium of 21 societies promoting the interests and value of research throughout all medical disciplines in Europe. Find out more about UEG’s work, visit www.ueg.eu. Contact Information UEG Media Office +44 1444 811099 media@ueg.eu UEG Public Affairs (Brussels) Office +32 (0)2 5027771 publicaffairs@ueg.eu

Make your call for gastrointestinal and liver disease research funding before EU budget cuts.

(Vienna, February 13, 2015) With recent plans to cut billions from the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 funding programme, United European Gastroenterology (UEG) is urgently calling on the GI community to apply now for much needed research funding.

 According to the results of UEG’s major ‘Survey of Digestive Health Across Europe', gastrointestinal (GI) and liver diseases remain one of the most common causes of death and hospitalisation in Europe and are responsible for almost 500,000 deaths per year in Europe alone. “Although GI and liver diseases are on the increase and draining European healthcare resources, gastroenterology gets relatively little attention from a policy perspective compared with other specialities. However, research is essential to facilitate the development of more effective treatments and to improve mortality rates,” explains Professor Farthing.
Horizon 2020 is the European Union's biggest ever research programme with nearly 80 billion of overall funding available from 2014 to 2020. In spite of the EU Commission's proposal to cut billions from Horizon 2020's €24 billion scientific research programme, a healthy €154,000,000 is still available specifically for research grants on the topic of 'FET-Open- Novel ideas for radically new technologies'. “However, the deadline is looming with a call for proposals by 31st March 2015 so scientists need to take prompt action to develop steering groups and submit their application,” urges UEG President, Professor Michael Farthing.
“Gastrointestinal disorders remain a major threat to public health and it is important for medical research policies to respond to such threats;” adds Professor Michael Manns, UEG Vice President. To maximise the chance of a successful application, UEG advises scientists to consider the following 3 key points before submitting their proposal:
Commission’s priorities - does their work fit within the EU Commission's guidelines?
Organisation’s capabilities - can their organisation realistically manage and deliver the proposal? Economical and social impact - will their work provide return on investment and reduce the economic and social burden?
Further information and guidelines on the application process can be found at: www.ec.europa.eu/research/participants/portal/desktop/en/funding. Notes to Editors: Available for interview Professor Michael Farthing, UEG President; Professor Michael Manns, UEG Vice President Press contact Samantha Forster media@ueg.eu Tel:+44(0)1444811099 @UEGMedia Further information for Horizon 2020 Funding Applications is available at: General Information and Funding Opportunities - Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation - Horizon 2020 How to get Funding - Horizon 2020 About UEG United European Gastroenterology is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. Find out more about UEG's work at www.ueg.eu UEG Survey of Digestive Health Across Europe The Survey of Digestive Health Across Europe was commissioned by UEG in the spring of 2013 at the request of its own Future Trends Committee. An experienced research group from Swansea University in Wales, UK, initiated a detailed assessment of digestive health across Europe, focussing on the clinical and economic burden of disease and the organisation and delivery of gastroenterology services across 28 European Union (EU) member states, Norway, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Russia. The aim of the survey was to draw together all the available evidence and provide up-to-date information on the human health consequences and public health burden of GI disorders. References 1. Roberts SE, Samuel DG, Williams JG, et al. Survey of Digestive Health across Europe. Part one: The burden of gastrointestinal diseases and the organisation and delivery of gastroenterology services across Europe. Report for United European Gastroenterology. October 2014. 2. Anderson P, Dalziel K, Davies E et al. Survey of Digestive Health across Europe. Part two: The economic impact and burden of gastrointestinal diseases across Europe. Report for United European Gastroenterology. October 2014.

What will the European healthcare system look like in 2040?

(Vienna, October 21, 2014) United European Gastroenterology (UEG) has today launched ‘Future Scenarios’, three plausible models for future healthcare delivery in Europe, to encourage healthcare professionals and policy makers to start planning for a more sustainable future for patients with digestive and liver diseases.

These ‘Future Scenarios’, which have taken more than a year to develop, will challenge current thinking and aim to inspire the gastroenterology community to work together to shape a better future for patients.

“Current models for healthcare delivery in Europe are unsustainable, with a rapidly ageing population, volatile political and economic landscapes as well as a shrinking workforce and increasing lifestyle diseases,” says UEG President, Professor Michael Farthing. “If we don’t start planning for change now, we are all going to be facing a pretty uncertain future.” Unsustainable burden of GI diseases Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases contribute significantly to the healthcare burden in Europe, accounting for substantial morbidity, mortality and cost. Digestive diseases - gastrointestinal and liver disorders - are common across Europe, causing more than 500,000 deaths in 2008 in the 28 EU member states (and more than 900,000 deaths in the whole of Europe, including Russia and other non-EU states).  Over one-third of all acute hospital admissions are due to GI diseases and most Europeans will visit a gastroenterologist at least once in their lives. “We know that the incidence and prevalence of most major GI disorders are rising across Europe and there is already poor access to care in many countries,” said Prof. Farthing. “Since changing the way we deliver healthcare in the future seems inevitable, we decided to take a bold approach and highlight possible scenarios, inspiring everyone to get involved and play their part in shaping a better future for digestive and liver disease healthcare.” Healthcare in Europe 2040: Scenarios and implications for digestive and liver diseases Over the past year, UEG’s Future Scenarios Working Group has been collaborating with specialist scenario planners to develop a set of plausible, relevant and challenging scenarios that may impact the delivery of GI healthcare in 2040. These scenarios – entitled Ice Age, Silicon Age and Golden Age – will be launched today at UEG Week 2014, with more than 600 gastro and liver disease specialists as well as a wide range of stakeholder groups joining the debate. The healthcare scenarios for 2040 to be launched are: ·         Ice Age: Where European impoverishment will have led to two-tier medicine and eventually to the collapse of public healthcare in Europe. ·         Silicon Age: Where advancements in technology, science and social interactions will have led to very extensive automation of diagnoses and treatments and redirected health behaviour, resulting in a positive change in healthcare. ·         Golden Age: Where a strong, well-coordinated, unified Europe will ensure high-quality healthcare for ALL European citizens. “The three scenarios we have developed, which could all form the shape of healthcare in Europe in 2040, will help focus our thinking and encourage us to have courageous conversations about the future of gastroenterology practice,” said Prof. Farthing. “We see today’s launch as the start of those conversations and hope everyone will join the debate and work together to deliver high-quality care whatever the future holds.” Starting the Conversation Help us plan for a better future for people with digestive and liver diseases Visit www.ueg.eu/research/gi2040/ and vote for the scenario you think is most likely. Post your thoughts and comments on the future of digestive and liver diseases throughout Europe @my_UEG #GI2040. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099 Press Release Translations Download press release Download der Pressemitteilung Descarga nota de prensa Télécharger le communiqué de presse Download comunicato stampa Download プレスリリース Download 新闻稿 

UK expert highlights research innovation and is optimistic about the future of IBS treatment.

(Vienna, October 21, 2014) Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may at last be able to hope for a brighter future as innovative new treatments emerge and researchers clarify the role of current therapies.

Dr Alexander C. Ford from the Leeds Gastroenterology Institute in Leeds, UK, tells journalists attending the 22nd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2014) in Vienna, Austria, that significant progress was being made in drug development for IBS, thanks to the intense research efforts of scientists around the world. “Researchers have dedicated many years to the task of unravelling the pathophysiology of IBS, and it’s thanks to these efforts that novel molecular therapies are now in development,” he says.

Current therapies for IBS IBS is a chronic, relapsing–remitting functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, estimated to affect between 5% and 20% of the general population. The symptoms of IBS include recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and changes in bowel habit, including diarrhoea and/or constipation. Treatment is typically targeted towards the predominant symptoms, with increased intake of soluble fibre and antispasmodic agents frequently used as first-line therapies. Other treatment options with proven efficacy in IBS include certain antidepressants, psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioural therapy and hypnotherapy, and some probiotics.1 “We currently have a number of fairly effective short-term treatments available for patients with IBS, but, unfortunately, no drug treatment has so far been shown to alter the clinical course of IBS, and the long-term efficacy of current therapies is still unknown,” says Dr Ford. Emerging drug therapies Several promising new types of drug therapy have emerged in recent years for the treatment of IBS. Pro-secretory agents have been found to be effective in constipation-predominant IBS although their precise roles in the IBS treatment algorithm is not yet determined. Bile acid modulators are currently under investigation in IBS patients, with initial studies suggesting efficacy in constipation-predominant IBS. “The number of novel agents in clinical development for the treatment of IBS is a clear reflection of our growing understanding of the pathogenesis of the condition, but it also demonstrates the extent of the unmet medical need,” he says. “I think with the intensity of the research effort going into new IBS treatments, we can be optimistic for both IBS sufferers and the physicians who treat them.” Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099 Press Release Translations Download press release Download der Pressemitteilung Descarga nota de prensa Télécharger le communiqué de presse Download comunicato stampa Download プレスリリース Download 新闻稿

Survey reveals changing trends and inequalities in healthcare provision for GI disorders across Europe.

(Vienna, October 20, 2014) A major pan-European survey into the burden of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and the delivery of care has revealed changing trends in many important GI and liver diseases and worrying inequalities in the provision of healthcare services across the continent.

The results of the survey, which was commissioned by United European Gastroenterology (UEG), have been announced today and led to calls for greater political and public awareness of the burden of GI disorders across Europe and for more funding to be made available to improve service provision and support Europe-wide research.

“This extensive survey has highlighted major differences between countries in terms of both the risk of developing GI disorders and their long-term health outcomes,” said UEG President, Professor Michael Farthing. “We are particularly concerned about the increasing incidence of most major GI disorders across Europe and the clear differences in outcomes for patients between Eastern and Western nations.” Survey of Digestive Health Across Europe1,2 The Survey of Digestive Health Across Europe was commissioned by UEG in the spring of 2013 at the request of its own Future Trends Committee. Experienced research teams from the College of Medicine at Swansea University in Wales, UK, initiated a detailed assessment of digestive health across Europe, focussing on the clinical and economic burden of disease and the organisation and delivery of gastroenterology services across 28 European Union (EU) member states, Norway, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Russia. The aim of the survey was draw to together all the available evidence and provide up-to-date information on the human health consequences and public health burden of GI disorders. “Gastroenterology is a medical specialty that gets relatively little attention from a policy perspective compared with other specialties and attracts minimal independent research funding,” said Professor Farthing. “We wanted to take a long, hard look at the situation today across Europe in order to ensure we prioritise our efforts where it is needed most.” Changing trends in GI disorders The Digestive Health survey revealed a number of evolving trends in terms of the incidence and prevalence of GI disorders. According to the survey results, most European countries have witnessed increases in the incidence of major GI disorders such as upper GI bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], coeliac disease, alcoholic liver disease, gallstone disease, and colorectal and oesophageal cancer, with disease rates highest amongst older people. Incidence or prevalence rates were found to be higher in most Eastern European countries compared with other regions in Europe, with mortality from  GI disorders (other than cancer and infectious diseases) highest in Eastern and North Eastern countries and lowest in parts of Scandinavia and the Mediterranean Islands. GI cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death in Europe, and while mortality rates for colorectal cancer (CRC) have fallen for several decades in almost all Western, Northern and Central European countries, rates continue to rise in many parts of Eastern Europe and some parts of Southern Europe. “We need to look more closely at the reasons behind these worrying statistics and find ways to overcome the regional differences observed and reduce the growing burden of GI cancers,” said Professor Farthing. Inequalities in healthcare provision          The survey identified major inequalities in healthcare provision across Europe. While CRC screening programmes are now well established in most European countries, participation rates vary widely and there is no standardised approach to screening. Upper GI bleeding is managed variably across Europe, with a lack of consensus on best practice. Endoscopy services are patchy and not currently viewed as a priority by policymakers, which could have serious implications for meeting future service demands. Training of medical students in gastroenterology varies between countries and is poorly documented. “This survey was wide-ranging and has highlighted some areas of good practice, but many areas that require attention at both a national and European level,” said Professor Farthing. “Our hope is that, ultimately, the survey and the reports generated will help to improve care and health outcomes and reduce inequalities across the continent.” References 1.     Roberts SE, Samuel DG, Williams JG, et al. Survey of Digestive Health across Europe. Part one: The burden of gastrointestinal diseases and the organisation and delivery of gastroenterology services across Europe. Report for United European Gastroenterology. October 2014. 2.     Anderson P, Fitzsimmons D, Hale J, et al.. Survey of Digestive Health across Europe. Part two: The economic impact and burden of gastrointestinal diseases across Europe. Report for United European Gastroenterology. October 2014. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099 Press Release Translations Download press release Download der Pressemitteilung Descarga nota de prensa Télécharger le communiqué de presse Download comunicato stampa Download プレスリリース Download 新闻稿 

New e-learning developments shaping the future of gastroenterology and hepatology.

(Vienna, October 08, 2014) Ahead of UEG Week 2014, Vienna (18 October – 22nd October 2014) United European Gastroenterology (UEG) are delighted to announce their new and improved e-learning portal, providing a unique education platform with exciting innovations for the gastroenterology and hepatology community.

The UEG e-learning portal has grown exponentially and now includes thousands of categorised and searchable documents, media clips, CME courses as well as meeting content. As Dr Charles Murray, gastroenterologist at London’s Royal Free Hospital and Chair of UEG’s e-learning Taskforce, explains in the October edition of the UEG Journal, “The strength and advantage of the UEG educational platform is that the UEG Member Societies and UEG National Society Members feed into it, shaping a unique and comprehensive portal with extensive GI-related material and educational resources.” UEG provides high quality, accessible and independent education and training in gastroenterology. We carry out a range of activities, including training courses (both as e-learning and hands-on residential courses), hosting a huge online library and providing the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion. “UEG now look to improving their educational resources. We aim to do so by further engagement with Member Societies and National Societies through sharing of information, research and news and look forward to any ideas from members and specialists. UEG Education is at the beginning of an exciting stage in its development and we value input in shaping the future,” adds Dr Charles Murray. Throughout UEG Week in Vienna (18 October – 22nd October) attendees will be able to visit the UEG Education Lounge, a dedicated area at the Congress providing free access to UEG’s educational activities including the e- learning platform. UEG Week 24/7 – is a dedicated area on the UEG website, which also provides access to abstracts, e-posters and recordings from UEG Week all year round, allowing the whole gastroenterological community access to unrivalled expertise and knowledge anywhere and at any time. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099

Study finds link between depression and abnormal brain response to visceral pain in patients with IBS.

(Vienna, October 02, 2014) High rates of anxiety and depression amongst patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have led many researchers to believe there could be a causal relationship between psychological factors and IBS symptoms.

Now, scientists in Germany have found clear evidence that patients with IBS process pain signals from the gut abnormally, and that disturbed brain responses to pain are particularly pronounced in patients with more depression symptoms1.

At the 22nd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2014) in Vienna, Austria, Professor Sigrid Elsenbruch from the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany, will be presenting a new study which suggests that depression, but not anxiety, contributes to the abnormal pain processing observed in IBS in a model that addresses central pain inhibition during placebo analgesia. “Our study has shown that patients with IBS are less able to suppress pain signals in the brain coming from the bowel and that depression plays a role herein,” she says. “This study confirms the complex relationship between the gut and the brain and shows that affective disorders may contribute to the development or maintenance of disturbed pain processing in IBS.” IBS, anxiety and depression IBS is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder with prevalence rates of up to 23% reported.2 The condition is characterised by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort, in combination with bloating and altered bowel habits (e.g. diarrhoea and/or constipation). Depression and anxiety frequently co-exist with IBS, with a recent study reporting that 38% of IBS patients had clinically-confirmed depression (compared with 6% of healthy controls) and 32% had anxiety (compared with 13% of healthy controls).3 “The fact that so many people with IBS have anxiety and depression has led many to speculate that IBS is primarily a psychological, not a physical, disorder,” says Prof. Elsenbruch. “However, the condition is complex and most likely results from an interplay between psychological and biological factors. In fact, we don’t really know whether anxiety and depression result from having IBS or whether they contribute to the development or maintenance of symptoms. In many patients, both possibilities may be true at the same time.” The “brain–gut” axis in IBS There has been significant scientific interest in the role of central nervous system mechanisms along the “brain–gut” axis in IBS. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that neural processing of visceral stimuli (i.e. stimuli generated from internal organs such as the intestine) is altered in IBS, with many IBS patients showing lowered pain thresholds.4 In Prof. Elsenbruch’s latest study, painful rectal distensions were performed using a pressure-controlled barostat system in 17 patients with IBS and 17 sex- and age-matched healthy controls.1 Neural activation in pain-related brain areas was assessed using functional MRI (fMRI) while subjects received sequential intravenous administrations of saline and what they thought was an anti-spasmolytic drug (but was actually a saline placebo), in order to observe activation patterns during a typical placebo pain response. The fMRI results in the healthy volunteers demonstrated reduced neural activation in pain-related brain areas during both the saline and sham treatment (placebo), indicating significant central pain inhibition. However, there was no such inhibition in the group of IBS patients, suggesting a deficiency in central pain inhibitory mechanisms in IBS. Interestingly, higher depression (but not anxiety) scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were associated with reduced central pain inhibition in this study. “Our findings suggest that patients with IBS do not process visceral pain signals in the same way as healthy people and are unable to suppress pain signals in the brain and, as a result, experience more pain from the same stimuli,” says Prof. Elsenbruch. “The fact that the presence of depression was associated with altered brain responses suggests that depression may contribute to these abnormal pain processes in IBS patients.” References 1. SchmidJ, et al. Gut 2014. May 15. pii: gutjnl-2013-306648. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2013-306648. 2. www.aboutibs.org/site/what-is-ibs/facts/statistics 3. Shah E, et al. Ann Gastroenterol 2014;27:224-30. 4. Elsenbruch S. Brain Behav Immun 2011;25:386–94. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099 Press Release Translations Download press release Download der Pressemitteilung Descarga nota de prensa Télécharger le communiqué de presse Download comunicato stampa Download プレスリリース Download 新闻稿 

Faecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for treatment of C. difficile infection.

(September 25, 2014) The transplantation of faecal microbiota has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines.1,2

FMT has emerged as a revolutionary, potentially life-saving treatment for this common infection, and is showing promise in the management of other microbiota-related conditions.3,4

Presenting at the 22nd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2014) in Vienna, Austria, Professor Antonio Gasbarrini from the Gemeli University Hospital in Rome believes that FMT should now be used more widely in order to reduce both the clinical and economic burden of microbiota-related disease. “FMT is an old procedure that has gained in popularity in recent years,” he says. “When used in patients with recurrent C. difficile infections, which are extremely difficult to treat, FMT eradicates the bacteria in around 90% of cases with a good safety profile.” The challenges of C. difficile infection C. difficile infection is the most common cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea, and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Infection rates have been rising rapidly in Europe and reports of emerging new strains, growing antibiotic resistance, and increased susceptibility in non-hospitalized individuals are of grave concern. C. difficile infection causes severe diarrhoea, intestinal inflammation and toxin-mediated cell death that, in severe cases, can lead to shock, hypotension, ileus or megacolon. Standard first-line therapies include the antibiotics, vancomycin or metronidazole, which are initially effective in most individuals. Unfortunately, approximately 20% of successfully-treated patients will have an infection recurrence, and many of these will experience multiple recurrences.5 “Recurrent C. difficile infections are particularly difficult to treat, with long courses of antibiotics further disrupting the normal gut microflora, putting the patient at great risk of serious complications such as sepsis or perforation of the bowel,” says Prof. Gasbarrini. “There is an urgent need for more effective treatments for recurrent C. difficile infections and FMT is definitely one of them.” FMT for C. difficile infection FMT is an innovative treatment that was first described in C. difficile infection in the 1950s, and is being used increasingly in everyday practice. In FMT, healthy microbiota harvested from a donated stool sample is transplanted into the intestine of the recipient – often by colonoscopy or enema – where it helps to restore the normal composition of the gut flora and overcome the toxic consequences of C. difficile infection. Studies in patients with C. difficile infection have confirmed that the treatment has a good safety record and is highly effective – quickly eradicating recurrent infections in around 90% of patients.5,6 While once considered a last-resort option for only the brave or desperate, FMT is now officially recommended in influential European treatment guidelines for recurrent C. difficile infections.1,2 “FMT can be considered a very simple form of organ transplantation that does not require immunological matching of donor and recipient and does not need immunosuppression after the procedure,” says Prof. Gasbarrini. “I am delighted that FMT has now been formally recognised as an effective treatment for recurrent C. difficile infection and I hope the technique will now be used more widely in an effort to relieve some of the burden of this troublesome infection.” References 1. Debast SB, et al. Clin Microbiol Infect 2014; 20 (Suppl 2): 1–26. 2. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Faecal microbiota transplant for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. NICE interventional procedure guidance 485. March 2014. 3. Cammarota, et al. Intern Emerg Med 2014; 9: 365–373. 4. Smits LP, et al. Gastroenterology 2013; 145: 946–953. 5. Cammarota G, et al. J Clin Gastroenterol 2014 Jan 16. 6. Van Nood E, et al. N Engl J Med 2013; 368: 407–415. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. From October 18-22, 2014, UEG will connect everyone to its annual meeting via livestream on www.ueg.eu. State-of-the-art lectures of Europe’s largest GI meeting may be followed online from around the world. Include #UEGWeek in your tweets. UEG Week 24/7 features all recorded sessions from UEG Week and provides convenient and direct access to the complete congress material, including E-posters and abstracts. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including: · UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion · Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations · UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology · EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu Follow UEG on Twitter @my_ueg and @UEGMedia Press Contacts Samantha Forster Email: media@ueg.eu Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099 Press Release Translations Download press release Download der Pressemitteilung Descarga nota de prensa Télécharger le communiqué de presse Download comunicato stampa Download プレスリリース Download 新闻稿 

Wheat-related disorders – Gluten-free diet may do more harm than good.

(September 18 , 2014) Cereals such as wheat have long been considered a fundamental food source, yet growing numbers of people are intolerant to them and the list of wheat-related conditions seems to grow daily. Now, experts are calling for a greater awareness of wheat-related disorders in order that gluten-intolerant patients are diagnosed more swiftly and receive the best possible treatment.

Cereals such as wheat have long been considered a fundamental food source, yet growing numbers of people are intolerant to them and the list of wheat-related conditions seems to grow daily. Now, experts are calling for a greater awareness of wheat-related disorders in order that gluten-intolerant patients are diagnosed more swiftly and receive the best possible treatment. According to a paper, ‘Wheat-related disorders: A broad spectrum of ‘evolving’ diseases,’ published in this month’s UEG Journal,experts Professor Giovanni Gasbarrini and Dr Francesca Mangiola suggest that people eating a gluten-free diet may also be at risk of developing new food intolerances, due to excessive substitution of alternative carbohydrates and foods containing nickel which may lead to additional health problems. They offer the following practical advice to clinicians on how to differentiate between coeliac disease and other gluten-related disorders to diagnose conditions more effectively and ensure sufferers do not follow a gluten-free diet unnecessarily: ·         Perform a thorough medical history, with particular attention given to the native gut microbiota. ·         Extensively explore the symptoms and assess the presence of any history of allergies. ·         Evaluate the genetic background with great care because it is often important to target or confirm the diagnosis and in some cases, make it unlikely. Gluten: the wheat toxin Gluten is a substance found in wheat, barley and rye that is composed of the two proteins, gliaden and glutenin. Researchers believe that gliaden is the gluten component people react to when they have wheat-related disorders. A number of distinct medical conditions are now recognised to be gluten-related including coeliac disease, wheat allergy and the newly-defined condition, non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. According to Gasbarrini and Mangiola’s paper, among the problematic disorders related to gluten, around 10% may be wheat allergy, 6% may be non-coeliac gluten sensitivity and only 1% is coeliac disease.1 Commenting on the article, UEG Spokesperson, Professor Antonio Gasbarrini said it is important to raise awareness of wheat-related disorders in order that people are not left undiagnosed and suffering. “Gluten-related disorders, like all food allergies, are extremely disabling and can have a major impact on people’s lives,” he said. “Most of us have heard of coeliac disease, but the other conditions are also very distressing and they are far more common.” “Many clinicians struggle to differentiate between the wheat-related disorders so practical advice like this is always helpful,” adds Prof. Gasbarrini. “Hopefully, as clinicians and patients become more aware of the range of conditions associated with wheat and gluten, the quicker they can be diagnosed, receive the most appropriate treatment and prevent associated health problems.” Reference 1.     Gasbarrini GB, Mangiola F. Wheat-related disorders: A broad spectrum of ‘evolving’ diseases. United European Gastroenterol J 2014;2(4):254-62. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4114114/. Notes to Editors About UEG Week UEG Week is the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting in Europe and has developed into a global congress. It attracts over 14,000 participants each year, from more than 120 countries, and numbers are steadily rising. UEG Week provides a forum for basic and clinical scientists from across the globe to present their latest research in digestive and liver diseases, and also features a two-day postgraduate course that brings together top lecturers in their fields for a weekend of interactive learning. About UEG UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European societies concerned with digestive diseases. Together, its member societies represent over 22,000 specialists, working across medicine, surgery, paediatrics, gastrointestinal oncology and endoscopy. This makes UEG the most comprehensive organisation of its kind in the world, and a unique platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge. To advance standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across Europe and the world, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives besides UEG Week, including:    ·        UEG Education, the universal source of knowledge in gastroenterology, providing online and classroom courses, a huge online library and delivering the latest GI news, fostering debate and discussion  ·         Training Support, funding for innovative training and educational programmes, as well as international scientific and professional co-operations ·        UEG Journal, published bi-monthly, covering translational and clinical studies from all areas of gastroenterology ·        EU Affairs, promoting research, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, and helping develop an effective health policy for Europe Find out more about UEG’s work. Visit www.ueg.eu

Press contact    

Samantha Forster:

Email: media@ueg.eu

Tel: +44 (0)1444 811099

 

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