Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer (CRC, bowel cancer) is the most common type of GI cancer in Europe, with 342,137 new cases (14.3% of all cancers) recorded in the EU in 2012 and an overall incidence rate of 68 per 100,000 of the population. Colorectal cancer accounts for around half of all gastrointestinal malignancies in Europe, 47% among men and 54% among women in the EU. 

View further information, download infographics and gain expert opinion on colorectal cancer below. All information is taken from the UEG Survey of Digestive Health Across Europe, unless otherwise stated. 

Colorectal Cancer (CRC) In Europe
Colorectal Cancer (CRC) In Europe
Colorectal Cancer In Young Adults Across Europe
Colorectal Cancer In Young Adults Across Europe
UEG White Book - Colorectal Cancer
UEG White Book - Colorectal Cancer
Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Annual Incidence And Mortality Rate
Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Annuall Incidence And Mortality Rate
Alcohol and Colorectal Cancer
Alcohol and Colorectal Cancer
UEG White Book - Gastrointestinal Diseases
UEG White Book - Gastrointestinal Diseases
 
 
  • There were 342,137 new cases of colorectal cancer recorded in the EU in 2012
  • Colorectal cancer accounted for 14.3% of all cancers recorded in the EU in 2012
  • The incidence rate of colorectal cancer is 68 per 100,000 of the population
  • For men, the incidence rate is 79 per 100,000 of the population
  • For women, the incidence rate is 54 per 100,000 of the population
  • Incidence among men appears to be highest in parts of eastern Europe, including Slovakia, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovenia
  • Incidence among women appears to be highest in north western Europe, including Denmark, Norway and the Netherlands
  • Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in European men and second most common cancer in European women
  • Colorectal cancer is the second biggest cancer killer in Europe and one European dies from CRC every 3 minutes
  • However, prognosis for colorectal cancer is relatively good when compared with all other major gastrointestinal malignancies
  • A one and five year survival rate of 75% and 48% overall in Europe from 2000 to 2012 were reported
  • There is relatively little variation in reported survival across most European countries, although prognosis is typically best in Scandinavia, western and central European countries (including Switzerland, Sweden, France, Norway, Belgium, Austria and Germany) and lowest in eastern European countries (including Bulgaria, Latvia and Lithuania)
  • More than 80% of people with colorectal cancer in Europe undergo surgical treatment
  • Five year survival after surgical resection ranges from 40% to 60% depending on the stage of the tumour
  • The introduction of cancer screening programmes across Europe has become much more widespread over the last five to ten years
  • Persistent rectal bleeding or blood in the stools
  • A change in regular bowel habits
  • Pain in the abdomen
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • A family history of colorectal cancer
  • Hereditary conditions; Lynch syndrome or familial adenomatous polyposis
  • Long-term ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease
  • Diabetes
  • Diets low in fibre and high in saturated fats and sugar
  • A sedentary lifestyle
  • Heavy alcohol consumption
  • Smoking

Speak to one of our experts to learn more about colorectal cancer. Please email media@ueg.eu for further information (full contact details can be found at the bottom of the page).

Contact

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media@ueg.eu