Liver Cancer and Liver Disease

Chronic liver disease has been estimated to affect almost 30 million people in the EU, while a total of 51,319 new cases of liver cancer were recorded in the EU in 2012. Malignancies of the liver accounted for 7.5% of all GI cancers in the EU (8.8% for men and 5.7% for women). Liver disease and cancer are both often linked to heavy alcohol consumption, with increases in hospitalised cases of alcoholic liver disease widespread across Europe in the last two decades (122% in Finland; 166% in Scotland; 138% in England & Wales). 

 

View further information and gain expert opinion on liver cancer and liver disease below. All information is taken from the UEG Survey of Digestive Health Across Europe, unless otherwise stated. 

Liver Disease Across Europe
Paediatric Liver Disease Across Europe
  • A total of 51,319 new cases of cancer of the liver and intrahepatic bile ducts were recorded in the EU in 2012 with an overall incidence rate of 10.2 per 100,000

  • This was higher among men (14.7) than women (6.0)

  • Malignancies of the liver accounted for all GI cancers in the EU, 8.8% for men and 5.7% for women
  • Prognosis for liver cancer is generally poor, with one and five-year survival of 33% and 10% in Europe overall from 2000 to 2012
  • Unexplained weight loss

  • Loss of appetite

  • Itchy skin

  • Feeling tired and weak
  • Patient demography

  • Liver disease, either through viral hepatitis, alcoholic cirrhosis or through inherited disorders such as haemochromatosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

  • Hereditary factors

  • Obesity

  • Smoking
  • Chronic liver disease has been estimated to affect almost 30 million people living in the EU

  • Increases in hospitalised cases of alcoholic liver disease over the last two decades are widespread, with increases of 122% in Finland; 166% in Scotland; and 138% in England and Wales
  • Mortality from chronic liver disease is well documented in Europe, with the highest rates reported in Eastern and North-Eastern countries

  • The prognosis for people with late-stage liver disease remains dismal and has not significantly improved in the last 50 years
  • Loss of appetite

  • Fatigue

  • Weight loss or sudden weight gain

  • Jaundice

  • Itchy skin
  • Heavy alcohol consumption

  • Hepatitis B or C infection

  • Exposure to certain drugs and toxins

  • Metabolic syndromes related to being overweight

  • Obesity

Speak to one of our experts to learn more about liver cancer and liver disease. Please email media@ueg.eu for further information (full contact details can be found at the bottom of the page).

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